Turku Castle

Viking-style beads in the Turku Castle gift shop

Viking-style beads in the Turku Castle gift shop

In my previous post I shared a bit about Blingi beads, along with beads from Turku Castle’s gift shop.  I thought I’d share a bit more from Turku Castle with you.

Beads

I found the beads mostly interesting because I am hoping to put together a Viking-inspired costume, and have been doing some research for it.  While obviously these are contemporary beads, I hope that they are well-researched in terms of authenticity.  I’ll have more to post about Viking-era accessories in an upcoming post.

Turtle broaches

Along with the beads, the gift shop also had round-style ‘turtle’ broaches worn on Viking woman’s aprons along with the beads.  These were really nice, but for 41 Euros each, a little too expensive for me for this upcoming costume.

Along with the historical-style jewelry items, the gift shop also had  the expected books and postcards, along with medieval-style tapestry items like table runners and pillow cases, pendants, key chains, wrought iron handicrafts, kid’s dress-up costumes (for little mini knights and princesses) and other nicknacks.

Viking-style round broaches at the gift shop in the Turku Castle

Viking-style round broaches at the gift shop in the Turku Castle

Of course, I couldn’t share a post about the Castle without a photo or two of the castle too, right?

The castle

Small display model of the Castle and the courtyard.

Small display model of the Castle and the courtyard.

The courtyard buildings all have brown roofs, while the castle buildings have green roofs.  In the courtyard buildings was the gift shop and some museum areas, though when we were there, the museum was in the middle of developing a display which we didn’t get to see.  The garden around the castle was also a lot more lush and pretty than what the model would suggest!

Exterior of the main entrance to the castle courtyard

Exterior of the main entrance to the castle courtyard

Approaching the courtyard the doorway looks terribly small compared to the size of the building.  It leads to a fairly long tunnel leading into the courtyard, and from there the castle itself.

From the castle website: “The Turku Castle is a cultural historical tourist attraction that is over 700 years old. The Castle has a museum, which demonstrates the history of the Turku region from prehistory to present day with its frequent exhibitions, events and furnished style rooms.”

From inside the castle courtyard looking towards the castle entrance

From inside the castle courtyard looking towards the castle entrance

Once through the tunnel and into the courtyard, the castle looms ahead. Unfortunately, it’s at this point where anyone with restricted mobility might face a struggle, as the door isn’t the door right in the centre, but rather the entrance is on either side, up a set of stairs, followed by more stairs to a room to the left on this picture.  There is an elevator inside the castle (it looked as though it might be used for deliveries since the castle offers event hosting, but I didn’t see an entrance for those with restricted mobility).

The castle offers a tour, though we did self-guided, following signage with arrows indicating where to go. Unfortunately in some cases doors were closed (and later when I explored on my own, they were open..) and it wasn’t always clear where to go to get the best effectiveness out of the visit. We were in a bit of a hurry too which also didn’t help a lot with seeing as much as we good and really appreciating our visit.  Still, it was quite a walk, with loads of (mostly even, thank goodness) stairs seeing everything including a jail, a nun’s chapel, a ladies drawing room, the King’s hall, and a large chapel with a lovely organ.

I’ll have more to share from the castle soon!

Turku Castle
Slottsgatan 80
20100 Turku, Finland
+358 2 2620300
turku.fi‎

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One comment on “Turku Castle

  1. […] an earlier post I showed you the exterior of Turku Castle.  This time around I’ll share a few photos from inside the castle, from a museum gallery on […]

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