Viking scissors & knives (Saga Museum)

The wax figures representing the earliest settlers of Iceland in the Saga Museum

The wax figures representing the earliest settlers of Iceland in the Saga Museum

I still have lots of photos from the Iceland and the Saga Museum in Reykjavik – I’m trying to break them up thematically, so today I am bringing you some photos of scissors and knives – though like my previous post, it’s a super-short post on the topic, since there weren’t many examples to photograph. I’m focusing entirely on the couple pictured above, who you’ve seen from a few of the previous Saga Museum posts.

A female Viking figure carrying a pair of snips/scissors

A female Viking figure carrying a pair of snips/scissors

Here the female figure is wearing a pair of snips hanging from her tortoise brooches.  A comment on an online forum suggested that these really low-hanging items may be somewhat impractical – while the length of the cord that holds them would make them easy to use – they would also easily get in the way while moving about…  (These ones hang to about mid-thigh for example).  I did end up shortening one of my hanging keys for the same reason – I found that it just got in the way in an obnoxious kind of way when I was wearing it.

These kind of snips are interesting, because they’re almost exactly the same design that you can buy today. I’ve seen the historical examples in museums, and have seen replicas from a variety of eras – a friend even got me a pair of modern ones for my costuming and sewing efforts that although made in China, look and operate the exact same way. (Check out this pair of hand-forged ones from LeatherCrafts on Etsy for a photo of a modern example.)

A Viking male figure carrying a knife

A Viking male figure carrying a knife

Next up, the male figure is wearing a knife in a pouch hung from his belt.  It hangs alongside his sword which hangs from a belt-shoulder strap combination. I didn’t take a closer photo of the sword, since I can’t imagine playing a character who would carry a sword for starters, but a little knife like this seems much more practical.  The molded leather case seems very appropriate for what I’ve seen other re-enactors wear/make, though of course being leather, I don’t think I’ve seen any existing examples (though I have seen metal attachments for likely leather cases which have survived).

Sagamuseum – The Saga Museum
www.sagamuseum.is/
Grandagarður, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland
+354 511 1517

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s