Skjoldehamn hood – a new attempt

Rectangular construction hood (not to scale)

Rectangular construction hood (not to scale)

I started off with Hoods – two ways where I far preferred the fit of the hood with shoulder gores over the rectangle-constructed hood after the design of the Skjoldehamn hood. Then I did some research….

…and it looks like the Skjoldehamn hood is appropriate for the time-frame I’m most interested in, which means I’m drawn to give it another try and see if different pattern sizes won’t make for a more comfortable hood.

(if not, I’m going back to the Hedeby hood style!)

The material

I have some winter-white wool that I won’t use otherwise, and figured that it would work well for another attempt at this hood. The wool is from a second-hand wool skirt I was given – it’s way too small for me (and I wouldn’t wear a white wool skirt either!). The skirt probably is fairly old – the label indicates that it was made in “West Germany” just for starters… (The Berlin wall fell in 1989.)

I’ll also likely do embroidery with Pearl Cotton that I picked up for this wardrobe. I was disappointed that my hand-work didn’t show up well on the grey plaid I made up earlier, but all of the colours I picked (apart from the off-white…) should show up nicely on this off-white wool.

I’m not sure yet what I’ll line it with. Although the Pearl Cotton is colourfast, I suspect the linen I’ve been using might not be totally colourfast, and it would be a shame to put a coloured lining in – only to have it leach through when I wash the item. Likewise, I have some new white linen, but I haven’t cut into it yet to make anything, so I don’t have “scraps” that I really want to devote to the hood. We’ll see when I get there!

The pattern

I looked online for AGES to try to find someone willing to share the measurements they used to create their hoods – I guess because it’s such a simple design very few people included it.

One source indicates that the original find was:

  • Main rectangle  58 cm x 28 cm
  • Square gores 20.5 cm x 20.5 cm
  • Neck tie at 13 cm from the hem

Another source (discussed on my research page) used the measurements of 55 cm x 55 cm for the main rectangle, which when divided in half would result with:

  • Main rectangle  55 cm x 27.5 cm
  • Square gores 22 cm x 22 cm

An online seller (discussed on my research page) lists their:

  • “large” hood – 63 cm long x 40 cm wide
  • “medium” hood – 58 cm long x 34 cm wide
  • No size hood – 66 cm long x 36 cm wide
  • No size hood – 64 cm long x 40 cm wide

I can only guess that they are only measuring the main rectangle for these measurements, though they don’t indicate the size of their gores. (Nor should they… they want to sell their finished goods!)

My original interpretation of the Skjoldehamn style hood (with some alteration)

My original interpretation of the Skjoldehamn style hood (with some alteration)

My original interpretation of the hood started with:

  • Main rectangle 109 cm x  41 cm (I cut one large rectangle and folded it)
  • Square gores 28 cm x 28 cm (three of them)

(note: These were my cutting measurements – including seam allowance – the finished hood is slightly smaller.)

I did find that the hood was too tight around the face, so for the next hood I’ll need to adjust it.

Of course, there’s also the suggestion that the back gore should be larger than the front gore….

I’ve decided to make my new pattern at:

  • Main rectangles (two each of) 50 cm x 64 cm
  • Front gore 30 cm x 30 cm
  • Back gore 39 cm x 39 cm

(note: These are measurements including seam allowances, the finished hood will be slightly smaller.)

Stay tuned…

In my next post I’ll let you know how it turned out in comparison!

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3 comments on “Skjoldehamn hood – a new attempt

  1. Gio Drakes says:

    Thank you for this! I just found your site. I am very new at garb, and I am having a hard time finding explanations for garments that will fit me. You look like you are smaller than me still, but it’s a great start for me! Thanks so much!

    • Dawn says:

      You’re welcome! I appreciate that sometimes it’s hard seeing just sketches, and wondering how they might fit and look on – glad to help, and hope that it’s inspired you to start trying a few new things 🙂

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