Viking Age desserts

If you follow Happy Sushi Belly, you’ve already seen this, but I thought I’d cross-post.

For a pot-luck I made two desserts out of the Viking Cookbook (found online). You can see the recipe and photos on Happy Sushi Belly: https://happysushibelly.wordpress.com/2015/08/31/viking-dessert/

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Historical Sew Monthly September – Brown Finnish Viking Age overdress

Brown wool peplos-style Finnish Iron/Viking Age

Brown wool peplos-style Finnish Iron/Viking Age

You might remember from my original idea-planning for this year’s Historical Sew Monthly, I was really wanting to do a Finnish Viking Age costume. I also REALLY didn’t know what to do for the brown challenge for September, because I really don’t care for the colour brown. I did ponder though this lovely brown and tan herringbone weave linen for the challenge (purchased last fall in Quebec City), which I had bought with the plans of a Viking-Age underdress. Plans have changed just slightly, and for the challenge I’m presenting the overdress instead, in a delightful brown herringbone weave Australian wool. (I wish you could feel this wool.. it’s smooth and soft and GORGEOUS…)

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Embroidered Apron Panel

Open-front apron dress with embroidered front panel

Open-front apron dress with embroidered front panel

This is one of those… grudgingly approached projects. If you remember from my Open Front Apron Dress post, I have some qualms about how period-correct the idea of wearing an open-front apron dress with a rectangular apron panel might be. The open-front apron seems totally impractical (although yes, it might have been something worn for special occasions) though at least the panel seems a bit more practical – as long as it’s belted that is so it doesn’t fall into the fire when you’re leaning over the fire!

Still, once I made up the dress, I needed to make the panel, so I figured I’d just go for it.

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Open-front apron dress

Open front apron dress

Open front apron dress

I’ve seen a lot of women online in open-front apron dresses with their Viking-age costumes. I understand that they’re getting the idea because some brooches were found with many different fabrics in them, and thus there’s speculation that more than just one apron (dress) may have hung from one set of brooches – but I don’t know… the whole idea seems very impractical to me – it’s basically like a coat that is open in the front and doesn’t cover your shoulders or sleeves. The open front also means it doesn’t protect the garments under it from smoke, dust, dirt, etc… Still, there’s argument to say that it may not have been an ‘every day’ garment, but rather something for special wear…

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