Trichinopoly (Viking Knit) class

There are a few people who indicated that they’d like to learn how to do Trichinopoly, and so I offered to teach a class/workshop.

I wanted to put together a short post for those interested to pick up supplies/etc.

Class description

Introduction to Trichinopoly (Viking Knit)
Drífa at lækjamoti

A hands-on introduction to Trichinopoly, sometimes called wire weaving, wire knitting, or Viking Knit. This technique produces beautiful chains documented to multiple ages and cultures, useful for necklaces, adorning clothing, and for practical use. Students will learn how to start, loop, add additional wires, and finishing options.

In a 2-hour class, students should be able to finish a length of chain suitable for a bracelet.

In a 1-hour class, students will be introduced to the technique, but will complete their projects after class.

Class limit: 2-8
Cost: Free to attend, but supplies will be needed (below)
Age limit: adults

Supplies

The wire packaging

The wire packaging

  • Wire – I recommend copper wire, easily available through craft stores, bead stores, etc. I have purchased mine through Beads & Plenty More. If there’s time, you can also order online; I’ve shopped with Fire Mountain Beads and Etsy as well.

You should be able to make a necklace in any style from one 30-yard roll, however the amount of wire needed greatly depends on the style you make.

Avoid stainless steel wire, silver wire, brass wire or gold wire for your first project. Silver-plated copper wire is ok, but plain copper (available in a variety of colours, including silver-colour and gold-colour) is cheaper for your first project.

(As pretty as it is, avoid the Artistic Wire in turquoise colour.)

I recommend 24 gauge wire for your first project, however 26 gauge also makes a nice chain (though it takes a bit more wire).

  • Jig wire – You will also need a length of wire for the jig. This should be at least 24 gauge,  (22 gauge is also fine) and you can use the same wire as above. I recommend inexpensive wire – this won’t be part of your project. A contrast colour is nice to see what you’re making. If doing this in a group, you could just use a length traded with someone else. I recommend copper wire for this as well.

Tools

Joining a new wire into the chain

Looping the wire onto the dowel

Dowel – you’ll need a dowel, approximately 1/2″ in diameter, by approximately 12″ long. The length isn’t totally important – you just need a part to work on and a part to hold. Shorter is fine, longer might get in the way, but it’s up to you. The diameter is a bit more important – 1/2″ will allow for enough room to work, though you can adapt with narrower and wider.

I’ve always used wood, but theoretically you could also try using any smooth, long rod with an even diameter along the length.

  • Wire snips – These are vital.
  • Very fine needle-nose pliers – These are totally optional.
  • Nylon-head broad pliers – These are optional but very useful.
  • Masking tape – you’ll just need a small strip.
  • Straight pin – This is optional but useful. An alternative is a small sewing awl, or a sturdy sewing needle.
  • Ruler – or measuring tape
  • Fine-tip felt pen – totally optional
  • Pen/pencil, notebook – optional

You may also wish to bring (scent-free if possible) hand lotion (I find my hands get sore after a while) & glasses (if you need them for close work like reading or embroidery). If you have difficulty working with small needles (etc.) you may also find the optional pliers & straight pin more useful for grabbing & manipulating the wire.

Finishing

Once you’ve learned the technique, you’ll need a few items for finishing.

  • Pliers – these are just to grasp the wire to pull it through the drawplate.
After going through the smallest drawplate hole, (approx 6 cm) the chain is 24 cm

My drawplate and fine needle-nose pliers

  • Drawplate – this is just a piece of wood (hardwood if you have it) with a series of holes in it. The largest hole should be the same diameter as your dowel, and the holes can get smaller from there.If you don’t have (or don’t want to make) a draw plate, you can also use (non-precious) plastic household objects with gradually reduced hole sizes to reduce your chain width. The chain may damage these items; so don’t use anything that isn’t ultimately disposable. Don’t use anything too hard like metal, as it could damage your wire.Below is a photo of some of the things I’ve used for draw plates before – two thread spools, one spool for elastic thread, and a spool for bridal elastic/trim.
  • 8-row Viking Knit red copper wire 'chain'.

    8-row Viking Knit red copper wire ‘chain’& the make-shift draw plates I used

  • Chain ends/jewellery components – these are totally up to you, you can use jump rings, end caps, bead caps, more wire, ribbon, cord… etc. I’ll show a few options in the class/workshop/demo, so you won’t need to get these until you’ve completed your chain.

Some examples of ways to finish off the ends of chain:

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Optional design elements

You can also add leather cord, mix your chain with other chains or cords, beads, pendants, etc…

For more…

For more inspiration, instructions, and ideas, you can also check out my other Viking Knit posts here.

 

Alternate description submitted for Yule 2015

Introduction to Trichinopoly
Aka Viking Knit / Viking Wire Weaving, this technique produces beautiful chains documented to multiple ages and cultures, useful for jewellery, adorning clothing, and for practical use. Students will learn how to start, loop, add additional wires, and finishing options. Attendees should have time to finish a small project or start a larger one in class.

With Drífa at lækjamoti

Maximum 6 students

Cost: $10.00

1 hour block

Digital hand-out only, no paper copy provided.

 

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2 comments on “Trichinopoly (Viking Knit) class

  1. Rhia says:

    I love this technique! I used to go to silver jewelry course where we tried this. I made necklace (and matching bracelet) from very fine silver wire. It was drawn into very fine necklace for a vintage pendant I have. Fun but very slow to work.

    • Dawn says:

      Very nice! I have a project in mind where I need to get some nice silver wire too – though I still need to find a supplier that isn’t quite so expensive as the shop locally!

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