Tweed German gollar

German gollar

Complete teal wool gollar – a German Renaissance capelette/collar

In early January I showed off a German Renaissance Gollar – a sort of cape/ collar/ partlet kind of over-garment/accessory. I made up my first version in teal wool suiting with black velveteen lining.

I wanted to try a different method for supporting the neckline, so decided to make a second version.


This version uses the same solid teal wool from the velveteen one to line the gollar, and as a guard/trim on the exterior. The fashion fabric is teal wool tweed.

Exterior of the tweed gollar

The tweed came from my fabric stash – I’m pretty sure that it was gifted to me by a former teacher, but it might also have come from one of the Grandmother’s fabric sales… I’m kind of forgetful about it’s origins.

The solid teal wool was leftover from the other gollar, and I also used it to make the split-brim hat. I had incorrectly cut one of the pieces when making the velveteen-lined gollar, but using some piecing enabled me to salvage it – for the lining of this.  Little pieces were cut on the bias to make the trim.

I sewed all the little bias pieces together, and pressed in the long edges on both sides.  I sewed together the front and back of the gollar, marked the trim edge, and then sewed one edge of the trim, just barely on the fold-side of the folded trim.

The first edge of the trim on the German Gollar was sewn by machine, but the other side was sewn by hand.

The first edge of the trim on the German Gollar was sewn by machine, but the other side was sewn by hand.

From there I could press the guard in place again, and then hand-sew the other edge of the guard down to the exterior of the gollar.

After that the gollar with it’s guard/trim got another good pressing.  In the photos below I’ve illustrated the benefit of a good steam and a pressing block which traps the steam in the wool and lets it cool with the pressure of the block.

In the first photo I have quickly pressed the trim, and in the second I used steam, then put the block over the steamed area, and let the wool cool.

You can see how much smoother the steamed and press-cooled trim lays on the gollar.

The benefit of a good pressing and a good wood block to smooth out the trim on my wool German gollar.

The benefit of a good pressing and a good wood block to smooth out the trim on my wool German gollar.

The pattern for the interlining for the German Gollar, supporting the neckline.

The pattern for the interlining for the German Gollar, supporting the neckline.

Next I pieced the solid teal wool for the lining, and decided to do a partial interlining with canvas. This canvas is likely a cotton-linen blend; I got this fabric for free as well and can’t be certain of it’s content.

The pattern was based off the exterior, going into the shoulders and supporting the back neck and shoulders as well as the front opening. I loved how the gollar looked when I tested the pattern with the sides/shoulders standing tall, and wanted to support it staying like this. I could have built in a “break” for the collar to fold, but I actually really liked it standing tall as well.

I love how the interlining for the collar actually totally stands on it’s own! I ended up overlapping the seam allowance rather than doing them right-sides-together, because I thought this would add more support and spread the bulk of the seam allowance better.

Sewing the interlining inside of the lining on the German gollar

Sewing the interlining inside of the lining on the German gollar

I basted the interlining into the lining with a zig zag stitch just so that it wouldn’t shift when I sewed the lining to the exterior fashion fabric.

Despite being under a deadline, I finished this off… and then ended up not wearing it at the event. Once I had the gown done, I really prefered the teal and black gollar (with the black lining side out!) instead of the colour of this. I think this will look really good with a lower-class gown instead though!

Stay tuned!

German gollar

German Renaissance Cranach gown costume with gown, chemise, gollar, cap, sleeves, and hat.

If you’re reading this post when it’s posted… hold on tight, I’ll have the next stage of my last-minute German Cranach Gown in a few days… In the meantime, come check out what I’m making next on my Instagram feed, or come follow me on Facebook, and you’ll get up-to-date posts about all of my new costume, sewing, and crafting projects.

If you’re reading this post well after the publication date, click the “Cranach Gown” tag to see all of the posts related to this gown, or the German Late period category to see all posts about late period German garb, including the accessories I made to go along with this outfit.

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