Bias printed circle skirt – HSF November

A long plaid bias skirt inspired by an Edwardian Historical Sew Monthly challenge for the November 2017 challenge - Inspiration.

Long Edwardian-inspired bias plaid skirt

November’s Historical Sew Monthly (Fortnightly) theme is Inspiration – taking a look at what other members have made over the past several years and using it as inspiration for our own project. In my initial brainstorming post, I had a number of thoughts about inspiration, but as the deadline got closer and closer (and I’ve missed so many themes this year!) I was drawn to something more practical for every-day…

I loved Åsa Petersson’s 1900s outfit with a brown wool jacket and a long plaid bias-cut skirt. I originally wanted to follow her example more specifically, using wool fabric and an Edwardian high-waisted cut, but I also had a need to use up some of my fabric stash instead of buying new fabric.

I had some very interesting bias-printed plaid knit fabric, which I thought would hang wonderfully in a long full skirt, so thought I’d start there. It’s a poor substitute – but makes up a wonderful long winter skirt.

Pattern for a French Edwardian-era skirt

Jupe Courtisane skirt pattern

I was looking at Petit Echo de la Mode, and noticed this historical French skirt pattern – and saw that the pattern was almost a half-circle skirt. I already had a great circle skirt pattern (that I used to make my skull print circle skirt #1 and #2, and a blue taffeta circle skirt) so since I was in a bit of a rush, decided to just use that for this skirt.  I lengthened it considerably, and removed some of the extra ease because this fabric has a lot of stretch and I wanted the smoother line at the waist like Åsa’s skirt.

After letting the skirt hang out for a few nights, I checked to ensure that it didn’t ‘drop out’, (it was fine, the knit was very stable) and I hemmed the skirt with a narrow hem. Normally on such a long skirt I’d do a deeper hem, but circle hems are difficult to do deeper, I didn’t want to lose any length, and the knit is heavy enough to work with a narrow hem. Åsa did a hem facing instead, which would be the more historical option for this type of skirt (as I did with my green silk skirt).

A narrow hem on my plaid circle skirt

A narrow hem on my plaid circle skirt

So… it’s not a very historically-informed skirt at ALL… but I think it has the LOOK that I was going for – and it will be much more wearable this winter!

Historical Sew Monthly

A long plaid bias skirt inspired by an Edwardian Historical Sew Monthly challenge for the November 2017 challenge - Inspiration.

Long Edwardian-inspired bias plaid skirt

The Challenge: November: HSF Inspiration – One of the best things about the HSF is seeing what everyone else creates, and using it to spark your own creativity. Be inspired by something that has been made for the HSF over the years to make your own fabulous item.

Inspired by Åsa Petersson’s 1900s outfit with a brown wool jacket and a long plaid bias-cut skirt.

Material: bias-printed plaid knit

Pattern: self drafted

Year: 1900s

Notions: Thread, elastic

How historically accurate is it? Not very much at all. I was going for a every-day wearable skirt with the look-and-feel of the inspiration costume.

Hours to complete: 4? Completely machine sewn.

First worn: While out shopping… lol

Total cost: Fabric and elastic were in my stash… the fabric was approximately $9.99/meter. The elastic would have been a few dollars.

A long plaid bias skirt inspired by an Edwardian Historical Sew Monthly challenge for the November 2017 challenge - Inspiration.

Long Edwardian-inspired bias plaid skirt

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