Historical Sew Monthly 2017 in review

With the announcement of the 2018 challenges, and my completion of the December 2017 challenge, I thought it was time to do a little 2017 challenge review for the Historical Sew Monthly challenges.

January: Firsts & Lasts

German Renaissance style costume hat

My German Renaissance Split-Brim hat with grey ostrich feathers worn with my black velveteen Gollar and my Cranach gown costume.

Create either the first item in a new ensemble, or one last piece to put the final fillip on an outfit.

For this challenge I created a German Renaissance Gollar . (click for the full post)

February: Re-Make, Re-Use, Re-Fashion

German Renaissance style costume hat

My German Renaissance Split-Brim hat with grey ostrich feathers worn with my black velveteen Gollar and my Cranach gown costume.

Sew something that pays homage to the historical idea of re-using, re-making and re-fashioning. Turn one thing into another. Re-fit or re-fashion an old gown into something you would wear again. Re-trim a hat for a new outfit, or re-shape a modern hat to be a historical hat. Re-purpose the fabric from an old garment (your own or a commercial one) into a new garment.

For this month’s challenge I made a Split-brim German Renaissance hat. It worked very well with the gollar! I never have finished the hem of the dress though – so it might be something I’ll finish off for submission for a future challenge.

March: The Great Outdoors

Get out into the weather and dirt with an item for outdoor pursuits. 

Unfortunately I missed completing this challenge.

April: Circles, Squares & Rectangles

Black wool-blend coat to add to my Viking Age garb kit. This has a red and black twill reverse facing and hand embroidery using pearl cotton.

Selfie in my black wool-blend coat with red and black trim. Worn over mundane clothing with my faux fur stole.

Many historical garments, and the costumes of many people around the world, use basic geometric shapes as their basis. In this challenge make a garment made entirely of squares, rectangles and circles.

For this challenge I made a Black and red Viking Age style coat, though I could have used it for March…

May: Literature

The written word has commemorated and immortalised fashions for centuries, from the ‘gleaming’ clothes that Trojans wore before the war, to Desdemona’s handkerchief, ‘spotted with strawberries’, to Meg in Belle Moffat’s borrowed ballgown, and Anne’s longed for puffed sleeves. In this challenge make something inspired by literature: whether you recreate a garment or accessory mentioned in a book, poem or play, or dress your favourite historical literary character as you imagine them.

This month I didn’t meet the challenge goal.

June: Metallics

Selfie wearing my new Red and gold Giornea. I'm wearing it with a mundane top, jeans, and belt.

Red and gold Giornea (worn with mundane clothing)

Make something in silver, gold, bronze, and copper, whether it be an actual metal, cloth of gold or silver, or lamé.

For this month’s challenge I made a Red and gold Italian over dress.

July: Fashion Plate

Make an outfit inspired by a fashion plate, whether it is a direct replica, or a more toned down version that fits the resources and lifestyle of the character you are portraying. If you want to stick to a period prior to the 17th century advent of fashion plates, either re-interpret a Victorian ‘historical’ fashion illustration as period accurate, or use an image from your period that depicts and idealised and aspirational fashion.

Unfortunately I didn’t meet this month’s challenge goal.

August: Ridiculous

Fashion is sometimes a little silly, and historical fashions can look particularly odd. Make something that was considered outrageous in its own time, or is just utterly ridiculous to modern eyes.

Unfortunately I didn’t meet this month’s challenge goal.

September: Seen Onscreen

My newest Egyptian costume - an orange loose sheath dress with 'sleeves' and a v-neck with a teal 'coat'.

Orange loose sheath dress with ‘sleeves’ and a v-neck with a teal ‘coat’.

Be inspired by period fashions as shown onscreen (film or TV), and recreate your favourite historical costume as a historically accurate period piece.

For this challenge I made a Egyptian costume

October: Out of Your Comfort Zone

Plaid apron dress (hangerock) with a fake fur stole and white linen underdress. Adding new items to my Viking Age wardrobe.

Plaid apron dress (hangerock) Full length, unbelted

Create a garment from a time period you haven’t done before, or that uses a new skill or technique that you’ve never tried before.

I kind of feel like I short-cutted this challenge a little, and made a Very early Viking-Age apron dress. Really, it was just a matter of what I was making, and I tried to fit it into the challenge.

November: HSF Inspiration

A long plaid bias skirt inspired by an Edwardian Historical Sew Monthly challenge for the November 2017 challenge - Inspiration.

Long Edwardian-inspired bias plaid skirt

One of the best things about the HSF is seeing what everyone else creates, and using it to spark your own creativity. Be inspired by something that has been made for the HSF over the years to make your own fabulous item.

For this month I made a 1900s Plaid skirt

December: Go Wild

Self-portrait done with a timer of my new green and gold 11th Century Byzantine costume

Self-portrait done with a timer of my new green and gold 11th Century Byzantine costume

You can interpret this challenge as an excuse to make something that incorporates animal print, or wild animals in some way, or to simply make something wild and over the top.

For this challenge I submitted a Pony-printed Byzantine gown  that I started over a year earlier.

2018

Historical Sew Monthly 2018 logo. Click to visit the Dreamstress site.If you missed it, I posted about the challenges for 2018, and what I hope to accomplish!

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