Black and white wool tote bag

Black and white wool tote along with a naalbound hat and some of my Viking Age bling

Black and white wool tote along with a naalbound hat and some of my Viking Age bling

Just a quick post here – nothing too special, just thought I’d share the new bag I made for my Viking Age reenactment gear for events.

I like my block printed black wool tote bag for events, but have found that the (secret) zippered pocket inside is a bit too small for all of the things I want to keep secure – so I opted to make a new bag with a much larger internal “pocket” for secret (secure) stuff… It’s also embellished with pretty embroidery.

The outer fabric is the leftover wool blend from my black and white Viking Age Norse coat, while the lining of the bag is leftover black linen from my black linen hangerock. The outer pocket is lined with a different linen from my scrap bin.

Back stitch at the top of the outer pocket on my new tote bag

Back stitch at the top of the outer pocket on my new tote bag

For a functional embellishment I sewed the top edge of the pocket with a backstitch. This was done on a bus ride up to Edmonton.

I also did a running stitch on either side of the straps to top-stitch down the edges.

For the top edge of the bag, I did a totally decorative accented cross stitch along the top edge.

The diagonal stitches that start off the cross stitch on the top of my new wool tote

The diagonal stitches that start off the cross stitch on the top of my new wool tote

It starts with diagonal stitches (I used the pattern in the weave for reference), and then I go back and do another line of opposing diagonal stitches…

Finishing the cross stitch on my wool tote bag

Finishing the cross stitch on my wool tote bag

I used pearl cotton from my stash for the stitching, though I did need to go out and get more thread while up in Edmonton because I ran out on the bus…

Originally I opted to do a running stitch in white pearl cotton (once home again) but though the line wasn’t quite right… so removed the running stitch and did a back stitch instead which creates a much shorter line to accent the cross stitch.

 

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