Byzantine textile inspired bling box

The top of this wood burned box was based on a 11th century textile.

The top of this wood burned box was based on a 11th century textile.

I really wanted to continue with pyrography (wood burning) after my first round of wood-burned bling boxes. My intention was to make one for each of the costumes I currently have to hold small things like jewellery, belts, etc. for each of my costumes… but then possibly for other little things I need to tuck away.

This next box was for my Byzantine costume set. Currently, I have two different Byzantine-inspired costumes. One is the blue gown with red, blue, and gold accessories, and the second is the block-printed bronze ponies on green silk with gold and red accessories. I also have a cloak for this costume, though it matches much better with the blue gown than the green.

The top of this wood burned box was based on a 11th century textile.

The top of this wood burned box was based on a 11th century textile. Shown here on my block printed green silk gown

Unfortunately, I don’t have a lot of small accessories that will fit in this box. The accessories for this costume include a rather large hat, a collar and front piece for each costume, a belt (which will fit), wrist cuffs (to give the impression of attached decorative cuffs, while allowing me to wear different underdresses) which will also fit in the box, and a necklace – which too will fit. I may in time figure out additional jewellery like bracelets or additional necklaces.

Box top

The top of this wood burned box was based on a 11th century textile.

The top of this wood burned box was based on a 11th century textile.

Like the other boxes, I transferred the image using carbon paper, and then burned the design with my wood burning kit. Unfortunately I can only use one of the nibs right now, because I can’t get it out to replace it with another! I’ll need to ask someone with more strength in their fingers than I have to help me at some point.

In this image below, the boldest lines have been burned (the leg and top of the wing) while the rest are just carbon paper tracing.

I stained this box with two coats of “Mahogany” stain. I love the colour, though it’s considerably darker than I expected it to be. I then finished it with two coats of clear satin varnish – there’s not really any shine at all in the finished box, but it should be well protected against moisture.

Inspiration

 The original fabric features two paired griffins in medallions, circa 11th Century, Byzantine.

I used paired Persian horses on my block-printed silk Byzantine gown, but thought I’d do something different for this box… and the griffin (nicknamed ‘Fluffy’) is the symbol on the heraldry on the SCA kingdom of Avacal (the kingdom I play in).

I also did a simple repeat pattern around the front, back, and sides of the box, with the hopes that it might help me remember what is in the box if I stack a few on a shelf.

Sartor Bohemia  has a textile reproduction on their Pinterest board, though I don’t know if it’s available on their website currently. They do some amazing reproductions, but all quite expensive – too costly for a gown for me at this time for sure!

 

Want to see what else I’m making?

If you want to see more of my work-in-progress photos, come follow me on Instagram! If you want to see more finished projects, please either subscribe to my blog, or follow me on my Dawn’s Dress Diary Facebook page, where each of my blog posts gets published so you can see when new posts come out.

See more of my pyrography projects by clicking the content tag: Pyrography.

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