Natural dyeing – Wood Ash Lye modifier

testing the pH of my wood ash lye - about a 12

testing the pH of my wood ash lye – about a 12

In all of the natural dyeing I’ve been doing (or hoping to do!) in the last little while, I read a little about using wood ash as a dye modifier. In Rebecca Burgess’ Harvesting Colour: How to find plants and make natural dyes, she notes that wood ash can be used interchangeably with soda ash to create an alkali after bath. In reading about fermentation dyeing, wood ash lye also came up, and further it came up in my experiment with my first woad harvest.

Continue reading

Natural dyeing – Woad v1, 2019

Just a small amount of woad leaves from my first harvest

Just a small amount of woad leaves from my first harvest

Back last spring, I was excited to receive some woad seeds from a friend in Norway.

I’m unsure about the variety of woad these seeds were, but based on photos online, I suspected that they were European Woad ( Isatis Tinctoria ) versus Chinese Woad (Isatis Indigotica). The Chinese version apparently isn’t particularly good for dyeing, as it doesn’t have enough indigotin compared to the European variety.

Continue reading

Natural dyeing – Rhubarb

Rhubarb dyed and mordanted wool, along with untreated wool

Rhubarb dyed and mordanted wool, along with untreated wool

Rhubarb leaf mordant

Along with chemical mordants like aluminum, copper, and iron, Jenny Dean also notes the use of staghorn sumac leaves, and oak galls as possible sources of natural mordants in Wild Colour: The complete guide to making and using natural dyes. These are rich in tannin she notes, which helps colour adhere and increases light and wash-fastness on vegetable fibres.

However, since I am LOVING spinning wool (and didnt’ love spinning hemp or flax that much in comparison) I really was interested to read about her recommendation for protein fibers – rhubarb leaves.  Continue reading

Largesse thread winders

Thread winders for largesse

Thread winders for largesse

The next project that I wanted to do on the laser cutter at the Maker Space was a largesse project for my SCA group. An acquaintance helps organize a largesse-making group called the Fellowship of the Things, and they were hosting a half-dozen largesse raising for summer Coronation. I wouldn’t be able to attend the event, but I thought I would try to make something to send along.

Continue reading