Embroidered Apron Panel

Open-front apron dress with embroidered front panel

Open-front apron dress with embroidered front panel

This is one of those… grudgingly approached projects. If you remember from my Open Front Apron Dress post, I have some qualms about how period-correct the idea of wearing an open-front apron dress with a rectangular apron panel might be. The open-front apron seems totally impractical (although yes, it might have been something worn for special occasions) though at least the panel seems a bit more practical – as long as it’s belted that is so it doesn’t fall into the fire when you’re leaning over the fire!

Still, once I made up the dress, I needed to make the panel, so I figured I’d just go for it.

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Open-front apron dress

Open front apron dress

Open front apron dress

I’ve seen a lot of women online in open-front apron dresses with their Viking-age costumes. I understand that they’re getting the idea because some brooches were found with many different fabrics in them, and thus there’s speculation that more than just one apron (dress) may have hung from one set of brooches – but I don’t know… the whole idea seems very impractical to me – it’s basically like a coat that is open in the front and doesn’t cover your shoulders or sleeves. The open front also means it doesn’t protect the garments under it from smoke, dust, dirt, etc… Still, there’s argument to say that it may not have been an ‘every day’ garment, but rather something for special wear…

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Black Linen Apron Dress

New black apron dress, worn with new brooches, a new key, and a new festoon.

New black apron dress, worn with new brooches, a new key, and a new festoon.

 

After successfully putting together my red linen apron dress, I wanted to complete my wardrobe with a black one.

In terms of authenticity, I know that black is incredibly hard to dye naturally, and that linen wouldn’t easily take the black dyes that are out there – but still…  WANTED a black linen apron dress! Continue reading

Red Linen Apron Dress

Red linen apron dress - just missing the brooches!

Red linen apron dress – just missing the brooches!

After making the blue linen apron dress, I wanted to adjust the pattern and make it up in red as well. This also happened to coordinate perfectly with the Historical Sew Fortnightly challenge #16! (Read more about that at the end.)

I used the Fabrics-store.com 100% linen IL019 – multi-purpose linen in a 5.3 oz/yd weight, in colour Biking Red – its a bit less cranberry than the photo online (at least on my monitor) and pretty much exactly the colour I had in mind. (Shown with the black linen underdress from a previous post.) Continue reading

Saga Viking Apron dresses

The wax figures representing the earliest settlers of Iceland in the Saga Museum

The wax figures representing the earliest settlers of Iceland in the Saga Museum

In a previous post, I showed off one of the styles of apron dresses shown on wax figures representing characters from Icelandic sagas at the Saga museum. Here I’m going to show off all of the different reproduction styles on display.

Hallveig Fróðadóttir, 874

The wax figures representing the earliest settlers of Iceland in the Saga Museum

The wax figures representing the earliest settlers of Iceland in the Saga Museum

This first display is of “Ingólfur Arnarson, who came to the country with his wife Hallveig Fróðadóttir in the year 874” –Saga Museum, and in this display they’ve portrayed the character wearing an apron dress that may be somewhat fitted through the bust and waist, with a flared skirt, and a curved shaped armhole.

Based on the reading I’ve done so far, it looks like a more fitted style like this might be is dated to the 10th Century (rather than the 9th as this display portrays) from finds in Hedeby and Birka.

Shaped arm areas on this  apron dress

Shaped arm areas on this apron dress

Melkorka Myrkjartansdottir

The next figure is wearing a drastically different apron dress – this one appears to be nothing more than two panels of fabric, folded at the top and pinned at the shoulders. The figure doesn’t appear to be wearing a belt to keep the over-garment from twisting around, falling into the fire, being blown about by wind… etc. The panel on the front is trimmed on the side edges such that the trim shows on the “wrong” side of the top part of the garment, and the “right” side of the lower part of the garment.

Mother figure wearing a folded apron dress held with "roach" shaped brooches

Mother figure wearing a folded apron dress held with “roach” shaped brooches

This style seems to be a variation of the Ancient Greek and Roman Peplos, which evolved considerably into the Viking Apron dress. However, this style does seem to have some later historical finds backing it up – from about 1000 CE. In Finland.

“Peploses were worn later in time in many northern European areas, such as in Anglo-Saxon England, and evidence that a similar garment was still being worn around the year 1,000 C.E. was found in a grave in Eura, Finland.”  – Cathy Raymond

In a document from an issue of the Compleat Acachronist (Issue #59) it is suggested that this peplos-style apron dress was used by the people in the area prior to what is known as the “Viking Age”. (Keeping in mind that the people living in the area now Finland were not “Vikings”.)

This figure’s display isn’t dated, but it comes before 1000 CE, and after 874 CE, so although it’s depicted as a more recent story than the first display, the figure is wearing an apron-dress in a style that is far, far older.

Another peplos-style apron dress: Freydis Eiriksdottir

Round brooches on her shoulder at the Saga Museum

Round brooches on her shoulder at the Saga Museum

The character above is also wearing a peplos-style apron dress. It too is two pieces of fabric, folded at the top, and pinned at the shoulder. There are no side seams but this character does have a belt on at least. This display also wasn’t dated, but would be about 1000 CE.

Another peplos-style: Thorbjorg litilvolva

The Volva at the Saga Museum

The Volva at the Saga Museum

The final figure is also undated, but also wears a  peplos-style apron-dress more aligned to a much older fashion, or fashion attributed to a different region and not Iceland. This is unadorned, apart from a contrasting band at the hem.

Conclusions

Like the previous post from the Saga Museum, I’m unsure if the inconsistencies between my other research and the apron-dresses displayed at the Saga museum are backed by their own historical research, if perhaps they developed their display based on Finnish models, or if perhaps they just represent inaccuracies.

With that in mind, although I enjoyed the displays, I don’t think I’m going to base any of my costuming research off their displays.

Sagamuseum – The Saga Museum
www.sagamuseum.is/
Grandagarður, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland
+354 511 1517