Viking age hoods: Jorvik & Dublin

Cap after the Jorvik cap, in linen with silk embroidery

Cap after the Jorvik cap, in linen with silk embroidery

In an earlier post, I mentioned that I wasn’t really interested in making a Jorvik hood as it’s a fairly simple cap, and I already had a simple linen cap not too dissimilar for early period garb.

However, I attended a Samhain feast in Montengarde (Calgary) and one of the women I’ve chatted with a bit was running a class during the day (before the delicious food graced our tables) on the Jorvik and Dublin hoods (from examples found in Viking-era digs at both Jorvik (York, England) and Dublin (Ireland)). In the class she had a handout (link here), as well as an example of a finished hood, so during the class I made one style (Dublin), and then later on (on a long car ride up to Edmonton) I made the other style (Jorvik) from some lovely thin linen I got on a terrific sale from Fabrics.com. Later still, I made a lined linen one using a scrap of fabric left over from a dress I made in the same fabric yet again in the Jorvik style, with some silk-thread herringbone stitching for decoration. (This one is much smaller, and much likely more accurate.)

Archaeological  support finds these simple caps from ninth and tenth century grave finds in Christianized areas in the UK, however no similar head coverings have been found from the same age in Viking Age Scandinavia. This suggests that as a general head-covering, this may be more about culture, fashion, to denote marital status or for religion specific to the UK rather than a general Viking Age fashion or for warmth/ protection from the elements.

With those being said… the hoods aren’t document-able for the areas ~I~ am looking at portraying, but are suitable for the Norse world in the time period I’m interested in… so I’m adding them to my kit with that in mind. Continue reading

Skjoldehamn hood – part 2

Embroidery stitches on my white wool Skjoldehamn hood version

Embroidery stitches on my white wool Skjoldehamn hood version

In my last post I talked a little bit about the reason I wanted to attempt the Skjoldehamn hood again, what I was using, and the pattern/measurements I was going to use.

Now that the hood is complete, I’ll share a little bit of how it came together. Continue reading

Skjoldehamn hood – a new attempt

Rectangular construction hood (not to scale)

Rectangular construction hood (not to scale)

I started off with Hoods – two ways where I far preferred the fit of the hood with shoulder gores over the rectangle-constructed hood after the design of the Skjoldehamn hood. Then I did some research….

…and it looks like the Skjoldehamn hood is appropriate for the time-frame I’m most interested in, which means I’m drawn to give it another try and see if different pattern sizes won’t make for a more comfortable hood.

(if not, I’m going back to the Hedeby hood style!) Continue reading

DIY Whipcord / 4-strand braid

My first strand of whipcord

My first strand of whipcord

I mentioned in my red linen apron dress post that I had used some four-strand braid / whipcord on the top edge of the apron dress… well that was AFTER I learned how to make it (of course!) I just am posting these a little backwards.

I also mentioned whipcord/ 4-strand braid in my previous post, where I had a bunch of different links for instructions/etc.  Well – here’s the results! Continue reading

Viking hood research

London Hood style hood

London Hood style hood

 

After I had already completed two hoods (and figured out which one I far prefer over the other..) I wanted to do a bit of research before considering making up a third (in some lovely winter-white wool that I’ll frankly never use for anything else…)

There seems to be four different types of hoods, each attributed to the Viking Age by re-enactor sewers posting on Pinterest, but I wanted to research and record what I could find about the four types before going much further with my project.

The four most common types seem to be:

  • Jorvik hood – really more of a simple cap (relatively low/no waste construction)
  • Skjoldehamn hood – a hood made from low/no waste rectangular construction
  • London hood – a hood with shoulder gores and flared seams (creating possible waste)
  • Bocksten hood – a hood with flared seams but no shoulder gores (again creating possible waste)

(There are other hoods as well, like the Orkney hood which some re-enactors like as a Viking hood, but the Orkneyjar dates the hood at considerably earlier than Viking Age.) Continue reading