Pretty printed prancing period Persian ponies

Painting in some of the details on the silk

Painting in some of the details on the silk

For an A&S night (a SCA evening where we practice Arts & Sciences) one of the local artisans taught  a workshop on block-printing, and let me borrow two of her fabulous wooden blocks – winged horses based of an extant Persian fabric. While the original is woven, the blocks make great look-similar-from-a-distance printed fabric!

(Check out her page “Adventures in Block Printing” on Facebook here, and her original inspiration for this block here.)

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Celebration – teal Giornea (overdress)

Complete "celebration" Italian outfit including the teal figured velvet overdress

Complete “celebration” Italian outfit including the teal figured velvet overdress

For Caterina’s elevation I wanted to make a Giornea – and overdress for the Italian Renaissance costume not unlike my previous Giornea. However, this time I wanted to try a different style, with an open front rather than open sides. I thought that this would be flattering, and would nicely show off the under dress (Gamurra).

I started by making a “muslin” or test garment/ mock up. I used a red and gold scroll home decorating fabric, which I’ll blog about soon. (Click the 1480s Florence tag to see all of my Italian garments.)

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Copper and blue beaded Trichinopoly chain

Beaded blue and copper trichinopoly (Viking Knit) chain, after going through my draw plate

Beaded blue and copper trichinopoly (Viking Knit) chain, after going through my draw plate

I completely love my latest Trichinopoly (Viking Knit) project. After making the silver-plated copper chain with garnets, I decided to try the technique with seed beads as well. It’s a five-row chain done in 28 gauge copper (the thinnest I’ve used so far) with a silver-lined blue glass seed bead every 3rd “stitch” – the result is much less bead-dense than the silver/garnet chain and the result is super light, delicate-looking, and pretty.

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Three-colour Viking Knit

Red, purple, and blue Viking Knit with skull end caps and a spring gate clasp.

Red, purple, and blue Viking Knit with skull end caps and a spring gate clasp.

After working with some of the coloured coated copper wire, I thought it would be interesting to use more than one colour in a piece, inspired by a neat example on my Pinterest board.

I picked up three spools of coloured wire – each supposed to be 26 gauge – red, purple, and blue. I wanted to red –> purple –> blue –> purple –> red and so on so there would be an effect of the red and blue transitioning with the purple in between.  The colours didn’t shift and transition as much as I had hoped, but I still liked the effect. The chain is all double-knit.

However, I found that the red was stiffer and appeared thicker than the purple and blue. I suspect that it’s actually 24 gauge, as it matched some of the other 24 gauge I had. I suspect the spool was mislabeled.

The red ended up being about 8 cm long with the purple at 4 cm long

The red ended up being about 8 cm long with the purple at 4 cm long

I ended up doing two lengths of red, one length of purple, two lengths of blue, one length of purple and so on since going back and forth with the purple would use more of that colour. I used about half a spool for each of the three colours. The end result is about 8 cm of red and blue, separated by 4 cm of the purple once the Viking Knit was drawn down through the largest hole in my draw plate.

The width of the finished tri-colour Viking Knit

The width of the finished tri-colour Viking Knit

When the Viking Knit came off the dowel, it was 56 cm (about 22 inches) long. I drew it through my widest draw plate hole, and the resulting chain was 80.5 cm (just under 32 inches).

Finishing

Red, purple, and blue Viking Knit with skull end caps and a spring gate clasp.

Red, purple, and blue Viking Knit with skull end caps and a spring gate clasp.

I cut down the length that I needed for a necklace (a bit shorter than the previous other necklaces I’ve made) and finished the ends. From there I slid on two large-hole beads, and then added on two skull-shaped end caps finished with a round spring gate clasp. The end caps are attached with adhesive which is suitable for metal and jewelry items.

Close up on the skull end caps on the tri-colour Viking Knit

Close up on the skull end caps on the tri-colour Viking Knit

Red, purple, and blue Viking Knit with skull end caps and a spring gate clasp.

Red, purple, and blue Viking Knit with skull end caps and a spring gate clasp.

 

 

 

Stainless Steel vs. Silver Viking Knit

Silver (the lighter) Viking Knit and Stainless Steel (the darker) Viking Knit

Silver (the lighter) Viking Knit and Stainless Steel (the darker) Viking Knit

The other day I shared my recent Stainless Steel Viking Knit necklace, using the same lion-head end caps as my Lion-head silver Viking Knit project. I thought I’d share two photos showing the two side-by-side, so you can see how easily the silver Viking Knit coils up (versus the steel, which doesn’t) and the colour difference as well.

Silver (the lighter) Viking Knit and Stainless Steel (the darker) Viking Knit

Silver (the lighter) Viking Knit and Stainless Steel (the darker) Viking Knit