Vikings in BC – keys (and brooches part 3)

Beautiful key from Sweden

Beautiful key from Sweden

In my last post you might have noticed a key in among the brooches as part of a larger display. While there are brooches in this post, this really is all about the keys from the Vikings in BC display, which came to Victoria, BC from Sweden. I visited the exhibit in summer 2014, but there have been so many things to blog about, that I still haven’t been able to post everything!

This will be another image-heavy post, so watch-out mobile users!

The key above seems to have been suspended using loop-in-loop chain.

 

Continue reading

Icelandic drinking horns

Drinking horns along with brooches and other items in the Iceland National Museum

Drinking horns along with brooches and other items in the Iceland National Museum

It doesn’t really directly apply to my interest in Viking Age costuming, but I thought I’d also share a display from the Iceland National Museum on some of the drinking horns.  These weren’t actually from the Settlement Age area of the museum, but rather in a display on the “New Ruling Class” in the Middle Ages in Iceland. The display stated that drinking horns “were common in the Nordic world in the Middle Ages, used for toasts on special occasions”, but that “only in Iceland were such horns decorated with carvings, the oldest one still in existence daring to the first half of the 15th century”.

From top left, clockwise:

  • “Drinking horn with carvings of King David, St. Olav and probably Solomon. Inscription: God so loved the world – 16th century”
  • “Drinking horn depicting Adam and Eve at [the] tree of [ ] Knowledge of Good and Evil. 17th century”
  • “Unusually well-preserved drinking horn with images of monsters, the head of a beast, a human face and interlaced decoration.”
  • “Drinking horn with images of St. Anne, Mary and infant Jesus, and Christ on the cross in the embrace of God the Father, 15th century.”
  • The dark coloured one in the back is noted as “Mariuhorn, drinking horn with the [inscription] Ave Maria”.

 

Carved horns  in the Iceland National Museum

Carved horns in the Iceland National Museum

Above – close up on the unusually well-preserved horn.

Continue reading