Kaarina Iron Age Hat

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Photo above from Beothuk’s Flickr feed. Direct link, no copyright violation intended.

In another instalment of “how much work can I do last-minute before an event?” I decided to tackle the Kaarina Iron Age (Finnish) hat.

This is a much-later post, as I actually made this earlier, but never actually finished it off, so put off posting this. As I’m going through my archive of drafts, I figured I’d share it – even in the stage it’s in. Continue reading

Finnish Costume Capsule

My new Finnish Iron Age outfit, minus the underdress.

My new Finnish Iron Age outfit, minus the underdress.

One of the ‘wardrobes’ I’m examining for my Capsule Costume Collection is my Finnish Iron-Age costume ‘wardrobe’.

Finnish Iron Age capsule wardrobe

Calling my Finnish Iron Age costume items a  “wardrobe” is a bit ambitious really. Right now what I have for this costume amounts to very few garments.

  • I have one peplos-style overdress, and use the under dresses from my Viking Age wardrobe.
  • I also have a small selection of accessories including a hat, two coil-embellished apron panels, and a few pairs of mittens.
  • I also have jewelry like a set of brooches, and two necklaces. There are other accessories I would like to add (or improve upon what I have) like a knife.

However, each layer works well with other layers, and I think it’s another good candidate for a capsule wardrobe.

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Laser-cut Finnish ‘bead hangers’

Three different sizes of the same wooden 'bead hanger' cut on the laser cutter.

Three different sizes of the same wooden ‘bead hanger’ cut on the laser cutter.

A while ago you might remember that I made a single bead-hanger based off a 9th Century Finnish design, cast in pewter. I still haven’t had the chance to make a second to be able to wear it, but after having access to the laser cutter at a nearby Maker Space, I decided to see about making them in wood for a totally different project instead…

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Beothuk’s photos from Coronation

As mentioned in my previous post, like at Twelfth Night, I wasn’t able to take much in the way of photos at Avacal’s Coronation and the Kingdom Arts & Science Championships because I was swamped trying to do other things. Luckily, one of the local photographers (Beothuk)took MANY amazing photos, and published them publicly online.

All photos are direct links from his Flickr feed – if he removes them, they’ll break here. All copyright his.

My Finnish Iron Age costume

I opted to wear my Finnish Iron Age costume for my presentation (using my early attempts at the coil-embellished apron and necklace while the updated, more accurate versions were on display for the judges to touch and feel). For Court in the evening though, I swapped out and wore the updated versions. Beothuk got a few photos  (I didn’t get any!)
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Court was pretty much hilarious all the way through – I don’t think that there was a single time I wasn’t laughing.

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Finnish coil-embellished apron (part 5: grid motif)

Completed grid ornament (small). It's about 2cm long

Completed grid ornament (small). It’s about 2cm long

In my previous post I showed off the corner fan-shaped motifs for my coil-embellished apron. Today I’ll show how I made the grid motifs which are a square or diamond (depends on if they’re displayed on point or not).

Small ornament

Divided and undivided strips of coils

Divided and undivided strips of coils

The grid-style ornaments start out by stretching out divided sections of coils. More about that in my previous post about finishing coils. I used the small-diameter coils for this work. The original extant aprons and mantles used more than one size of coil for embellishment.

The small grid ornament took eight strips of five coil bundles, and four small coil pieces.

The small division areas work to line up the coil strips and let me thread the linen yarn through the coils to fix them together. (below) I used a double strand of linen yarn, and left a long tail at the beginning of the work.

 

Lining up the stretched-out coils and matching them up

Lining up the stretched-out coils and matching them up

In the extant photos of coil ornaments, the little crosses are visible between the coil bundles, showing that this is how they were made.

Stringing on the coil strips

Stringing on the coil strips

After threading the coils into shape, I went through and smoothed the edges of the coil strips. I found this hard to do when the coils were loose, without distorting the coils, but once they were strung up this was much easier.

Just going through in one direction makes the ornament a bit `floppy`, so I also went back and went through the grid in both directions. This results in quite a sturdy ornament. I also finished the corners with small coil sections.

Completed grid ornament (small). It's about 2cm long

Completed grid ornament (small). It’s about 2cm long

I left the working yarns on the ornament after weaving them through the coils to attach the spiral motif to the apron.

Large ornament

The large square/diamond grid ornament was made in the same manner, except I used 14 strips of coils 8-bundles long. (Below)

Large coil ornament being placed in the middle of the apron

Large coil ornament being placed in the middle of the apron