Vikings in BC – Æsir

a "charm bracelet" with pendants associated with a number of Æsir gods.

a “charm bracelet” with pendants associated with a number of Æsir gods.

In my earlier post about the Vanir, I mentioned that I’d be sharing items associated with the other group of Norse mythological gods, the Æsir. The pantheon of the Æsir include Odin, Frigg, Thor, Baldr, and Týr.

The “charm bracelet” above has a hammer relating to the god Thor, and a fire-steel relating to the god Freyr.

 

A pendant, associated with the Æsir, indicating believe that this is of, or associated with the goddess Frigg.

A pendant, associated with the Æsir, indicating believe that this is of, or associated with the goddess Frigg.

 

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Viking woman’s grave goods

Assortment of goods found in a woman's grave

Assortment of goods found in a woman’s grave

I think that I’m nearing the last few posts about my trip to Iceland and the various museum exhibits I saw there – for today’s post about the Iceland National Museum in Reykjavik I’m going to re-visit a display of grave goods from a Viking Age woman’s grave.

The display included tortoise brooches which I showed in a previous post, a full necklace (also from a previous post) and a festoon that I also explored in a previous post.

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Early Christian Viking artifacts

"Wolf head hammer" from the Iceland National Museum

“Wolf head hammer” from the Iceland National Museum

My next post from the Iceland National Museum is another that isn’t quite directly related to costumes, but still pretty neat…

This display was all about the transition from Paganism to Christianity in Icleand. Iceland had a fairly different transition than a lot of other places in the Nordic world, and the display discussed that many Icelanders probably continued their pagan practices although they had also taken the Christian faith. The display elaborated that “occasionally Christian items are found in pagan graves; this may indicate that they were seen simply as ornaments, or that people were ambivalent about their beliefs”. It also said that it took some time for the Christian church to aquire paraphernalia in Iceland, and so there are very few artifacts from the early Christian days in Iceland. Continue reading