Saga Museum gift shop

I’ve already showed off some of the beads, needle cases, and festoons available from the Saga Museum gift shop but I thought I’d do a super-quick post showing off a few of the other items they had available.

A few jewelry items from the Saga Museum gift shop

A few jewelry items from the Saga Museum gift shop

Included in their display cabinet were wire bracelets (torc-style bracelets) round domed brooches, large ornate buckles, small brooches, strap/belt ends, penannular brooches, tri-lobed/trifoil brooches, pagan-style pendants, Jelling-style brooches, religious/spiritual pendants, and more.  I looked at a few of the prices that I could easily see, and they were too high for me to consider looking too much at or asking to see anything. (For instance, the small bronze penannular brooch in the middle below was 7800kr – about the equivalent of $78.00 Canadian.

Brooches from the Saga Museum gift shop

Brooches from the Saga Museum gift shop

Sagamuseum – The Saga Museum
www.sagamuseum.is/
Grandagarður, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland
+354 511 1517

Up close – Vikings in BC

Viking personal adornment display at the Royal BC Museum - close up of the ornate pin and the festoon

Viking personal adornment display at the Royal BC Museum – close up of the ornate pin and the festoon

In my previous post, I showed off some of the displays which included needle cases from the museums I visited in Iceland, as well as the Viking display from the Swedish Museum in Victoria, BC. Since I have a few additional photos from those displays, I thought I’d share them here.

Viking personal adornment display at the Royal BC Museum. This display included a skull with filed teeth, a large pin, a festoon, an ornate pin, whetstone, needle case, and purse.

Viking personal adornment display at the Royal BC Museum. This display included a skull with filed teeth, a large pin, a festoon, an ornate pin, whetstone, needle case, and purse.

The “personal adornment” display I showed in my previous post, and it includes a number of things beyond the needle case.  Pictured above is the festoon and ornate brooch.

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Hand-Made Penannular Brooch

Hand-Made Penannular Brooch

Hand-Made Penannular Brooch

Before I headed to Victoria, BC, I was keeping my eyes open for a Penannular brooch that I would like to purchase, but in the meantime I thought that I would try to make one of my own. I did end up getting my own ready-made, though I really like the ones I made too!  I’m sure there are better ways of making them, but since I don’t have much metal work experience, working with wire seemed like a good compromise that wouldn’t stress out my skill-set (or my budget!).

Tools:

  • Needle-nose pliers
  • Fine-needle nose pliers
  • Wire cutters
  • Hammer
  • Forceps
  • Mini anvil
  • Cylindrical shaping tool (I used a film canister for my larger one, and a Mr. Sketch marker for the smaller one.)
tools and materials for my Hand-Made Penannular Brooch

tools and materials for my Hand-Made Penannular Brooch

Materials:

  • 16 gauge silver-plated wire (I bought this at the bead store)

Technique:

I made this brooch twice – once larger, and once smaller. On the first version I did  it a bit differently, but the second time I thought worked better, so here’s what I did:

  1. Cut a length of wire for the brooch, and another for a pin. Both can be trimmed if needed later, so cut a little longer if you’re not sure.
  2. For the brooch I shaped the wire around a cylindrical object (I used what was handy) overlapping the ends
  3. Using the very small needle-nose pliers I shaped one of the ends into a loop, and set the brooch aside for the moment.
  4. For the pin, I curled one end into a ring, which will go around the brooch.
  5. The other end I shaped into a point by hammering it and turning the wire. I found holding the pin with forceps helped a lot to hammer the wire – and not my fingers! (Especially with the smaller brooch.)
  6. I also hammered the length of the pin to work-harden it and retain the flat, straight shape.
  7. Before sliding the pin onto the brooch, I hammered the wire to work-harden it, shape it, and shape the ring.
  8. Next I slid the pin onto the brooch, and repeated the loop on the other side of the brooch.
  9. Finally I hammered the brooch (sections at a time, avoiding the pin) to flatten the loops and work-harden the wire into the nearly-a-circle shape.
Hand-Made Penannular Brooches

Hand-Made Penannular Brooches

Inspiration:

Before I made my versions, there was a tutorial I found on Pinterest which recommends #6 copper wire for plumbing plus a brass braising rod.
However, I have also pinned this one from Deviant Art which uses a metal ring and Super Sculpty.