Dyeing with apple leaves and twigs

Finished apple leave and twig-dyed wool yarn showed with undyed yarn for comparison.

Finished apple leave and twig-dyed wool yarn showed with undyed yarn for comparison.

In my last post about dyeing with apple tree bark, I showed off my finished yarn (sort of a soft mustard with a touch of peach… but in actuality I did the research first, and then did some totally different dyeing before going back to what I had researched.

I wanted the chance to dye just with apple leaves, and a chance to dye just with the bark – BUT in all of my research I got antsy… too antsy to wait for the bark to soak, and too antsy to find the alum for the leaves and do the pre-dye mordant.

Continue reading

Natural dyeing with apple tree bark

natural white Romney handspun 2-ply wool dyed with apple tree twigs and bark

natural white Romney handspun 2-ply wool dyed with apple tree twigs and bark

We were trimming our apple trees this fall, and I thought I remembered something online about dyeing with apple tree bark. I did a super-quick search (as the branches were coming down practically) and found enough to make me want to save some of the branches for an experiment…

Continue reading

Pyrography box – medieval spinning

Wood burned box with a medieval woodcut image of three women in the process of producing yarn on the lid.

Wood burned box with a medieval woodcut image of three women in the process of producing yarn on the lid.

After my first round of wood-burned bling boxes, I decided I really wanted to make more – some as bling boxes for my various costumes, but some as sewing/gear boxes to hold various things particularly for my SCA play.

Continue reading

Processing Hemp Fibre

At Avacal September Crown event in early September I took a class on how to process hemp for fibre. The same techniques work for flax (linen) and nettle. The class was taught by Mistress Kataryna Tkach (her SCA name), who in her mundane life works with legal, licenced hemp for scientific study. Luckily, she has access to the “waste” plant material for fibre production and experimentation!

Continue reading