New tablet woven bands

New tablet woven bands from Etsy

New tablet woven bands from Etsy

Another super-quick shopping post today again… I promise those project posts are coming.. soon.. soon…

These are two new pieces of hand-woven tablet woven trim from a weaver in Poland – you can find her work on her Etsy shop: Kram Valgerd.

The grey trim is:

– Material: 80% wool, 20% polyamide
– Length: 410 cm
– Width: 20 mm
– Colors: light grey, black, graphite

The vine pattern seems to be a deviation of the Rams Head pattern, which as far as I know is NOT period correct for the Viking Age, but gosh it’s pretty!

While the blue is:

– Material: 100% wool
– Length: 450 cm
– Width: 17 mm
– Colors: light steel blue, navy

The design for the blue one is based on the Finnish Kaukola Kekomaki find, dated to the 10th or 11th century. (it also reminds me of one of my tattoos!)

Follow!

You can follow the weaver on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KramValgerd and while you’re there, why not follow me and my dress diary too? https://www.facebook.com/DawnsDressDiary

Vikings in BC – keys (and brooches part 3)

Beautiful key from Sweden

Beautiful key from Sweden

In my last post you might have noticed a key in among the brooches as part of a larger display. While there are brooches in this post, this really is all about the keys from the Vikings in BC display, which came to Victoria, BC from Sweden. I visited the exhibit in summer 2014, but there have been so many things to blog about, that I still haven’t been able to post everything!

This will be another image-heavy post, so watch-out mobile users!

The key above seems to have been suspended using loop-in-loop chain.

 

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Tablet Weaving

Tablet weaving examples from the Iceland National Museum

Tablet weaving examples from the Iceland National Museum

In the Iceland National Museum in Reykjavik there was also a display on tablet weaving. This wasn’t in the Viking/Settlement Age area at all, but rather upstairs with much later items. Still, as tablets have been found from Viking sites, and it appears that the technique has been around for many centuries, I wanted to include it here too.

Tablet weaving examples from the Iceland National Museum

Tablet weaving examples from the Iceland National Museum

This display was on 18th and 19th century objects, and included clothing and needlework including a brown balaclava helmet, two men’s caps and braces (suspenders) The tablet weaving was described as “tablet-woven skirt-bands” “used to hitch up the skirt when walking in wet or dirty conditions”. The display also included a pattern book from 1816 with different designs for needlework.

Tablet weaving examples from the Iceland National Museum

Tablet weaving examples from the Iceland National Museum

The example above looks like text woven into the strips.

Tablet weaving examples from the Iceland National Museum

Tablet weaving examples from the Iceland National Museum

The example above seems to have a reindeer or something woven into the band.

Tablet weaving examples from the Iceland National Museum

Tablet weaving examples from the Iceland National Museum