Third inspired-by-Midgaard hood

Photo credit ©Mysticus Photography - Me in my steel grey wool hood, along with other elements of my Viking Age Norse costume. These include my red and black coat, my plaid apron dress (hangerock), my green wool dress (serk) and my hand-spun naalbound wool mittens.

Photo credit ©Mysticus Photography – Me in my steel grey wool hood, along with other elements of my Viking Age Norse costume.

Steel charcoal grey wool hood

Once I had the black and grey wool-blend hood finished, I liked the results so much that I went to my stash of other fabrics from the Grandmother’s Fabric Sale and found another piece of wool, also with less than two meters. This fabric is a charcoal grey with a slight steel blue tinge to it. In sewing it I found it very spongy – it did not want to hold a press at all. (It is a tabby weave, not a crepe weave though.) You can see in the photo below my pattern – and the number of adjustments that were made before I got something I really liked.

Continue reading

Second inspired-by-Midgaard hood

Grey and black wool-blend hood

Sewing a second Midgaarb-inspired hooded capelet in black and grey wool-blend.

Sewing a second Midgaarb-inspired hood

Although I really liked the plaid hood I blogged about the other day, I thought that it was a bit short, and thought that it would be nicer with a longer, fuller capelet. I had some black-and-grey wool-blend fabric with an interesting square weave left over from another project, and so opted to cut out a second hood from this leftover, with a much longer capelet.

Continue reading

Viking age hoods: Jorvik & Dublin

Cap after the Jorvik cap, in linen with silk embroidery

Cap after the Jorvik cap, in linen with silk embroidery

In an earlier post, I mentioned that I wasn’t really interested in making a Jorvik hood as it’s a fairly simple cap, and I already had a simple linen cap not too dissimilar for early period garb.

However, I attended a Samhain feast in Montengarde (Calgary) and one of the women I’ve chatted with a bit was running a class during the day (before the delicious food graced our tables) on the Jorvik and Dublin hoods (from examples found in Viking-era digs at both Jorvik (York, England) and Dublin (Ireland)). In the class she had a handout (link here), as well as an example of a finished hood, so during the class I made one style (Dublin), and then later on (on a long car ride up to Edmonton) I made the other style (Jorvik) from some lovely thin linen I got on a terrific sale from Fabrics.com. Later still, I made a lined linen one using a scrap of fabric left over from a dress I made in the same fabric yet again in the Jorvik style, with some silk-thread herringbone stitching for decoration. (This one is much smaller, and much likely more accurate.)

Archaeological  support finds these simple caps from ninth and tenth century grave finds in Christianized areas in the UK, however no similar head coverings have been found from the same age in Viking Age Scandinavia. This suggests that as a general head-covering, this may be more about culture, fashion, to denote marital status or for religion specific to the UK rather than a general Viking Age fashion or for warmth/ protection from the elements.

With those being said… the hoods aren’t document-able for the areas ~I~ am looking at portraying, but are suitable for the Norse world in the time period I’m interested in… so I’m adding them to my kit with that in mind. Continue reading

Skjoldehamn hood – part 2

Embroidery stitches on my white wool Skjoldehamn hood version

Embroidery stitches on my white wool Skjoldehamn hood version

In my last post I talked a little bit about the reason I wanted to attempt the Skjoldehamn hood again, what I was using, and the pattern/measurements I was going to use.

Now that the hood is complete, I’ll share a little bit of how it came together. Continue reading