Grey and black open front apron dress- HSM Feb 2018

My black and grey apron dress worn with a new apron panel and my green under dress.

My black and grey apron dress worn with a new apron panel and my green under dress. Photo ©Mysticus Photography

I made an open front apron dress a while ago (in 2015), and discussed some of my skepticism with the whole open-front apron dress + apron panel combination that I see a LOT of with SCA Viking-Age reenactors online and elsewhere.

Colour palette for my Viking Age costume wardrobe

Current Viking Age Palette

Still, despite my skepticism on the ‘evidence’ for this style so far, I can’t deny the pretty… I got some grey and black wool-blend fabric from my former teacher, and wanted to make something Viking-inspired from it. It also just happens to work perfectly into my Viking Capsule Collection plans.

It would have made a wonderful coat, but I just finished making a new wool-blend coat and didn’t really need another (my black and red one is now one of three wool Viking coats in my Norse Reenactment wardrobe…) With a coat off the table, I thought an apron dress would work, and specifically an open-front apron dress ( hangerock).  I feel a lot more comfortable using wool blends for these speculative garments; saving my 100% wool fabrics for more documentable designs.

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Red & black Viking apron panel

Photo credit ©Mysticus Photography - my new embroidered apron panel along with other elements of my Viking Age Norse wardrobe

Photo credit ©Mysticus Photography – my new embroidered apron panel

In my Viking Age Capsule Collection post I mentioned that I wanted to slowly transition my Viking Age wardrobe to a red / black / grey / blue colour scheme. I found this red and black twill fabric at the Grandmother’s Fabric Sale in spring 2017, and since it was only 0.6 meters, there wasn’t really enough to do much. I reserved a piece for this apron panel, and then used the remainder for reverse facings on my black and red wool (blend) coat.

Colour palette for my Viking Age costume wardrobe

Current Viking Age Palette

I decided to do one side of this apron panel with the red, and the reverse with the same black I used for the coat. No real reason other than I had pieces of both leftover, and both match my current desireable colourway.

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Black & red early-period coat – April 2017 HSM

Black wool-blend coat to add to my Viking Age garb kit. This has a red and black twill reverse facing and hand embroidery using pearl cotton.

Black wool-blend coat with red and black trim

While most of my outerwear garments are for my Viking Age costume kit – I realized that this coat could really be for any early period that I might want to do, since the shapes are so similar across different styles.

Once I was finished with my term as Montengarde’s Emerald Rose, I wanted to shift my SCA wardrobe away from so much green, and back to my typical more goth aesthetic. I acquired some black wool-blend twill fabric, some red and black wool-blend twill fabric, and some black and grey wool-blend fabric (with an interesting basket-type of weave) from my former teacher and despite the partially synthetic content, I decided to start there.

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Turku Medieval Market demonstrations and vendors

A demonstrator showing spinning wool with a drop-spindle.

A demonstrator showing spinning wool with a drop-spindle.

This is the last post I’ll share about the Turku Medieval Market, (Keskiaikaiset markkinat) which is apparently the largest medieval market in Finland. Thus, it’s a bit of a photo-dump, with a number of photos about both demonstrations and other vendors I haven’t shared yet.

Music demonstration

Musical performers at the Turku Medieval Market

Musical performers at the Turku Medieval Market

There were a few different musical demonstrations that took place in the “stone sauna” area however I only caught one.

I have some video to share of this performance – please visit my Facebook page to see it!

Additional vendors

There are a few vendors I didn’t shop at and couldn’t really fit into the other posts I’ve made in the past. I wanted to share them here to show off some of the goods – but also to show off how they displayed their wares.

There were a number of different vendors selling wooden items to start with. I was really tempted to add some new wooden platters and bowls to my Viking Age -inspired feast kit – but I didn’t want to spend suitcase space on them with so many other things to shop for… I am hoping to still be able to find good pieces to add to my kit locally.

Additionally, there were a few vendors selling clothing and soft accessories. I’d like to pay special attention to the booths themselves. There were several of what seemed to be pre-made booths for some of the smaller vendors at the market.

One of the vendors at the Turku Medieval Market - Kaspaikkakerho (?)

One of the vendors at the Turku Medieval Market – Kaspaikkakerho (?)

In once case, there were little tables that had little roofs – they looked a bit like old-fashioned village wells. This really gave a medieval feel to the display rather than just having an ordinary table with a tablecloth on it.

The unifying look also was beneficial to the overall atmosphere.

These little “wells” were all in the garden/park area of the market, tucked along paths between trees and bushes. I suspect that the well roofs didn’t really offer the vendor much in the way of shade, so the shady area was likely appreciated.

One of the vendors at the Turku Medieval Market - Muinaisemum (?)

One of the vendors at the Turku Medieval Market – Muinaisemum (?)

In contrast, the public market square part of the market, as well as along the river had larger booths with a larger table out front (with the same tablecloth as the well-style tables) and a backdrop and slanted partial roof of red and blue fabric. The market square has very little shade, so these booths must have offered much more shade for the vendors.

Demonstrations

There seemed to be two types of demonstrations – vendors and volunteers.

Vendor demonstrations

A demonstrator showing spinning wool with a drop-spindle.

A demonstrator showing spinning wool with a drop-spindle.

I really liked the demonstrations being done by the vendors – showing off some of how they made the goods they had for sale. This vendor for instance (left) was selling sheepskins, wool insoles, drop spindles, and then a number of other wool-related items… and she stood demonstrating the drop spindle.

Her set up with lots of different levels and textures is nice too – and the Viking A-frame tent with the flap up gave nice shade.

A woman doing tablet weaving, while her male companion is doing some wood working at the Turku Medieval Market

A woman doing tablet weaving, while her male companion is doing some wood working at the Turku Medieval Market

The next photo is from near the booth where I bought the diamond weave twill – though I don’t actually remember what they were selling. She sat doing tablet weaving while he was doing some woodworking. It made for a charming tableau.

Volunteer demonstrations

In addition to the vendors doing demonstrations, there were also volunteers. I felt based on their attire that they had been rented from a costume company, since they were a bit “generic medieval” and there were several that were the same as one another apart from the colour (as well as some who were wearing almost a uniform…)

There were some sheep on display, some volunteers showing how to play games, some volunteers running a sort of carousel for children, and lots doing sort of a LARP / role-play in various areas. Unfortunately since they were all speaking in Finnish, I couldn’t figure out really what they were doing.

Check out the A-frame tent above – it’s huge! The people inside were demonstrating something on the floor, but I didn’t check it out.. I was too overwhelmed with how enormous the tent is! I have some video to share from different areas of the market – please visit my Facebook page to see it!

Jewellery purchases from the Turku Medieval Market

A pendant in the style of one of the Gotland Crystal pendants.

A pendant in the style of one of the Gotland Crystal pendants.

In my last blog post I mentioned some of the jewellery purchases I made at the Turku Medieval Market, (Keskiaikaiset markkinat), and today I’ll do my show-and-tell about what I ended up buying from the two vendors I mentioned.

Nordens Historiska Fynd

Most of the items I added to my Viking bling-kit are from Nordens Historiska Fynd. Their booth had an excellent clerk who was very helpful, and who let me know that many of their items were listed on their website with information about where the originals were from, inspiring their replicas.

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