Vikings in BC – brooches part 1

Box brooch from the Vikings in BC display

Box brooch from the Vikings in BC display

In a previous post I shared some brooches from the Vikings in BC exhibit. Today I have some more for you. Since I have a LOT of brooch photos, I’m going to be breaking this up over a few days, to limit the number of photos in one post.  You can click the Vikings In BC tag to see all of the posts from this exhibit. Continue reading

Vikings in BC – Æsir

a "charm bracelet" with pendants associated with a number of Æsir gods.

a “charm bracelet” with pendants associated with a number of Æsir gods.

In my earlier post about the Vanir, I mentioned that I’d be sharing items associated with the other group of Norse mythological gods, the Æsir. The pantheon of the Æsir include Odin, Frigg, Thor, Baldr, and Týr.

The “charm bracelet” above has a hammer relating to the god Thor, and a fire-steel relating to the god Freyr.

 

A pendant, associated with the Æsir, indicating believe that this is of, or associated with the goddess Frigg.

A pendant, associated with the Æsir, indicating believe that this is of, or associated with the goddess Frigg.

 

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Vikings in BC – Vanir

A large brooch from the Vanir display

A large brooch from the Vanir display

In my previous post about “two religions” from the Vikings in BC display in Victoria, I showed a number of crosses/crucifixes from Viking Age Scandinavia, along with some items from a transition period. In this post I’m going to show off pieces associated with Norse mythology Vanir, a group of gods associated with “fertility, wisdom, nature, magic” and the ability to see the future.

The pendant believed to be Freya, showing her necklace

The pendant believed to be Freya, showing her necklace

 

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Viking age pottery from Birka

Decorated pot

Decorated pot

I have just one more post to share with you from the Vikings in BC museum exhibit before I return to things I’ve made instead of just things I’ve seen.

The photos I’ll be sharing today are ‘from the kitchen’ so to speak of a Viking Age settlement in Sweden.

The items in this area were from a display on daily life in a trading centre. The display said:

“Trading centres would have attracted people seeking to sell their goods and services. Excavations of such sites also show that metal and foundry activities took place in small buildings.

The centres were probably very dirty and unhealthy. There were no fields to fertilize, so human and animal waste was dumped in ditches, along with household rubbish and waste from crafts and trades.

Given the unpleasant living conditions, craftspeople might have been forced to move to towns, rather than making a free choice.

However, only a very small proportion of the population lived in trading centres, so evidence found there is not representative of all Viking Age settlements.”

The vessel at the top of this page is made of ceramic, and is listed as  “Tatinger ware of Central-European provenance” found in a grave at Birka.

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