Teardrop-shaped bag

Teardrop shaped back pack

Teardrop shaped back pack

Someone brought some half-finished garments and fabrics to a SCA tavern in the summer. I took a dress that I thought might fit (and I loved the fabric) with a bit of work, but when I got it home I could tell it wasn’t really going to work as a dress.

I decided to salvage the fabric instead, and with it (and some purple broadcloth I had in my stash) to make a pretty day-pack.

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Spinning New Zealand Shetland fleece

If you follow me on Instagram (pssst – follow me!) you might have seen that during December I was able to borrow a spinning wheel from a friend and begin spinning some different wools that I bought at the going-out-of-business sale at Shuttleworks.

Since not everyone who reads my blog follows me on Instagram, I thought I’d show off a few of the photos here. 🙂

This wool is all New Zealand Shetland fleece, a natural, undyed off-white colour.

I decided to spin LOTS while I had use of the wheel, so I haven’t actually MADE anything else out of this yarn since spinning and washing (setting) it. It will eventually likely be used for naalbinding, unless I can fall in love again with knitting perhaps….

German gollar – Historical Sew Monthly January 2017

Finished teal wool Gollar worn with the wool-side out.

Finished teal wool Gollar worn with the wool-side out.

By early December I hadn’t yet started drafting a pattern for a Cranach gown, and was starting to feel nervous… when the Historical Sew Monthly posted the January theme, I could see an obvious item – and decided to make a German gollar for the challenge.

Historical Sew Monthly January 2017

What the item is: German Gollar

The Challenge: January: Firsts & Lasts – Create either the first item in a new ensemble, or one last piece to put the final fillip on an outfit.

Cathrin Åhlén (Katafalk) describes the gollar as a “common garment” for keeping warm; a short cape with “either a high collar or no collar at all, and it can be either short or it can be more of a cloak and go down to the hips”. She describes it as made in silk brocade with fancy clasps for higher social classes, but on “simpler women you almost always see no closure at all”. She speculates that those garments are closed with hooks and eyes, had no closures, or may have had hidden lacings. She notes that they can be lined in fur for extra warmth, and were often decorated with contrasting borders.

I found most examples of the border-decorated gollars on the ‘camp-follower’ (kampfraus, lower-class) styles, while when the gollar is worn with a Cranach-style gown, (court gown?) it’s almost always plain black. With that in mind I thought to make a semi-reversible gollar… though got a bit hung up on that when it came to the closure.

Since it’s a ‘top’ layer garment, worn over the dresses.. I would see it (and a hat) as the ‘last piece’ put on when dressing. In her “how to Frau” tutorial, Cathrin names the gollar as the last item (before accessories like purses, belts, etc). Funny enough, it’s the FIRST item I’ve made for this overall project, with the hopes that if I really can’t find enough time to finish the gown, that I can “throw” this over another gown and “pass” for an attempt at German. (Italian tourist perhaps?)

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Judges needed!

A&S display at Avacal Sergeant Trials, with my device banner on the end

A&S display at Avacal Sergeant Trials

As some of you living in Calgary or the SCA Kingdom of Avacal know, I’m hosting the competition to find my replacement as Montengarde’s Arts & Science champion at Twelfth Night, on January 21, 2017.

With that… I’m looking for judges!

Information about the competition (format, rubric, judging forms, etc) can be found here. You will note that the format is collaborative and supportive; I’m hoping that all of the judges can help competitors strive towards their best, can encourage amazing arts & sciences, and assist student judges (if applicable) to learn more about the process and participate to the level of their comfort.

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