Red & gold Giornea – HSM June 2017

Selfie in my new red and gold Italian over dress. This is my very late submission to the June 2017 Historical Sew Monthly (worn over mundane clothing).

Selfie in my new red and gold Italian over dress (worn over mundane clothing).

For Caterina’s elevation nearly a year ago I wanted to make a Giornea – and overdress for the Italian Renaissance costume not unlike my previous Giornea. However, this time I wanted to try a different style, with an open front rather than open sides. I thought that this would be flattering, and would nicely show off the green silk under dress (Gamurra).

Laying out the pieces for the overdress (Giornea)

Laying out the pieces for the overdress

I drafted the pattern based off my new Gamurra draft for the bodice, and used simple trapezoids for the skirt. No drafting there…

I did a mock up in a gorgeous gold and red brocade home decorating fabric. I bought this at the Grandmother’s Fabric Sale a while ago, and adored it, but it was only about 2 meters… I didn’t think I’d be able to find anything to make out of it…. but this worked out reasonably well. I wish I had more fullness for the skirt – but I hoped it would still be a wearable mock-up / toile. (I usually like to do mock-ups out of fabric that would make a wearable garment if the mock-up works out…)

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Beginner Blackwork class

Beginner blackwork class started with a piece of graph paper

First blackwork embroidery

At Avacal’s September Crown, one of the classes I took was a beginner blackwork class with my Barony’s former Baroness (who also does super-beautiful embroidery!). I haven’t done blackwork before, partially because it looks so complicated, but also because I’ve always thought it was a bit later than any of my main costuming personas.

Our instructor definitely helped clear up that first thought though!

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Sleeves for my Cranach gown

German Renaissance Cranach Gown costume

German Renaissance Cranach Gown costume

Last on my agenda for the German Renaissance Cranach gown costume was sleeves. I had very little time to work on these, and was considering them to be mostly optional…

Although none of the portraits showed a woman in shift-sleeves, I have seen many people at SCA events forgo the tie-on sleeves, especially in warm weather or indoor events. Still… I thought they’d be a higher priority as I was making this specifically for a court event, and thought sleeves would be a higher priority for the Cranach gown than the guards or the hem.

Despite my costuming experience, I even struggled with these… I wanted the two-part sleeves from my main reference portrait, with a snug upper sleeve and a lower sleeve with a point that drapes over the hand…

Upper and lower sleeve

My original two-part sleeve draft. The upper sleeve worked fine, but the lower sleeve didn’t fit correctly.

I started off with the draft from my green silk Italian Renaissance costume, referencing the marks and measurements from my red and gold striped gown (I couldn’t use that pattern as my arm measurements have changed in between). I marked the split between the upper and lower sleeves, and took in the lower sleeve a bit more because I wanted a very snug fit. I also added in the drape – but this ended up not really working when I cut out the pattern and taped it together again.

Cutting out the sleeve toile

Cutting the lower sleeve out of the yellow linen-look fabric for the toile

I cut the sleeve (just one, not both) out of my toile fabric (that same yellow linen-look synthetic that I got for free from my mum) and tested it out.. the upper sleeve worked – the lower sleeve didn’t. I adjusted my pattern and re-cut the lower sleeve… it still didn’t lay the way that I wanted it to.

Redrafting the lower sleeve

Completely redrafting the lower sleeve based on measurements instead of a previous sleeve block. I’m much happier with the fit of this lower sleeve instead.

I ended up completely redrafting the lower sleeve, and mocked it up as well. Success!

You’ll notice that the lower sleeve kind of has the shaping at the top like an upper sleeve – with a raised part and a lower part – the raised part goes behind the elbow, and the lower part goes inside the elbow.

However I didn’t get the drape, and couldn’t quite work out how to get it. I decided to skip that in the efforts of time, and instead made up a ¾ circle cuff flounce instead to mimic the flared cuffs seen in other portraits, though this was actually too much flare. I DID go ahead with this, but it’s something I’ll want to replace.

Gold silk cuff work in progress

The gold silk cuffs for my Cranach gown before clipping and turning them.

I sewed up the upper sleeve in black wool, the lower sleeve in black wool, and the cuff in silk damask. I bound all of the raw edges with silk damask bias. I should have hand-finished the bias… but again – time was of the essence here, as I was working on this Friday night before the event.

At the event in the morning, I used thin crochet cotton to “lace” the lower and upper sleeves together, and laced the upper sleeves to the bodice. The end result LOOKS really good I think, but there are still things I want to do to replace parts or improve the overall costume.

German Renaissance Cranach gown costume

German Renaissance Cranach gown costume with gown, chemise, gollar, cap, sleeves, and hat.

Next steps

the next things I’ll want to do is replace the lower sleeves (again!) to get a better cuff (perhaps finally figure out the drape!) and add lacing holes into the shoulder of the upper sleeves  (and the bodice) and lacing holes to lace the upper sleeves to the lower sleeves.  The crochet cotton works just fine, but isn’t a long-term solution.

Stay tuned!

Cranach gown complete costume (so far!)If you’re reading this post when it’s posted… I’ll have the final wrap-up for my German Cranach Gown costume in a few days. Please come check out what I’m making next on my Instagram feed, or come follow me on Facebook, and you’ll get up-to-date posts about all of my new costume, sewing, and crafting projects.

To see each part of this costume, click the “Cranach Gown” tag to see all of the posts related to this gown, or the German Late period category to see all posts about late period German garb, including the accessories I made to go along with this outfit.

Tweed German gollar

German gollar

Complete teal wool gollar – a German Renaissance capelette/collar

In early January I showed off a German Renaissance Gollar – a sort of cape/ collar/ partlet kind of over-garment/accessory. I made up my first version in teal wool suiting with black velveteen lining.

I wanted to try a different method for supporting the neckline, so decided to make a second version.

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