CoBloWriMo – August 10 – Visual Source

CoBloWriMo - Costume Blog Writing Month

CoBloWriMo – Costume Blog Writing Month

The prompt for today’s CoBloWriMo is “Visual Source” – and once I read that, I immediately thought of Pinterest!

Now… a lot of historical costumers look down their nose at Pinterest – but it’s not the beginning and end.. for me it’s just a jumping off place. Plus, there are so many awesome bloggers who have their images on Pinterest – with links to all of their great resources and thoughts – not to mention photos of their progress!
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Photos from Twelfth Night

I was so busy at Montengarde’s Twelfth Night (January 23, 2016) that I didn’t even bring my camera, but one of the guests brings his… and posted some photos online that are public viewing, so I thought I’d share them here! (Directly linked from his Flickr account, all copyright his – if he removes them in future, links will be broken.)

Fashion show contest

During court, I was super-excited to find out that I won the costume contest in the advanced category.

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Silk Road garb (Part 9 – Veil)

iPad selfie wearing my hat and veil

iPad selfie wearing my hat and veil

 

I really liked the photo of another costumer wearing her veil with her Propoloma, so made one as well.

Plus.. a veil just seems like something I’ll use for a variety of costumes.

I started with a meter of the linen gauze from fabrics-store.com. This is the 2.8 oz/yard linen, and I really like it. I suspect it will soften up nicely with washing which I think will be nice –however for pressing and sewing, the crispness was very good too.

I looked at Cathrin’s Katafalk page (https://katafalk.wordpress.com/2014/04/17/different-shapes-of-veils/ ) on the different shapes of veils, and thought that this shape was the most flattering.  I also thought that the half-circle veil looked the most similar to the veil the older women were wearing in The Birth of St John the Baptist, which means I could wear it with my Italian costume as well.

About four thread deep double-fold for this hem, secured with a running stitch (and a backstitch about every 5 stitches).

About four thread deep double-fold for this hem, secured with a running stitch (and a backstitch about every 5 stitches).

I cut a 1meter diameter by 70cm radius half-circle, pressed all of the edges with one very narrow fold, and then hand-stitched the next fold in place (folding by hand, not pressing) for a double-fold hem that is about 4 threads in from the edge – a total width of about 1/8th of an inch or 3-4 mm.

Hem on the veil is about 1/8th of an inch or 3-4mm

Hem on the veil is about 1/8th of an inch or 3-4mm

As I’m sure there will be many, many veils at events, and mine could easily be mistaken for another should I take it off, I opted to embroidery a small white “L” (for my last name) in one of the corners. The hand-done satin stitch goes over 2 threads in the weave, and the total “L” is about 8 threads wide.

Since I imagine a LOT of people at events will have 1/2 circle veils, I embroidered an "L" on mine to distinguish it from others, should it ever get misplaced.

Since I imagine a LOT of people at events will have 1/2 circle veils, I embroidered an “L” on mine to distinguish it from others, should it ever get misplaced.

Wearing


I also made two headbands of linen to pin around my head and pin the veil to, for when I’m not wearing the hat over top of it, but want to wear it on it’s own.

Silk Road garb (Part 8 – Belt)

Belt with a long-hanging end

beaded and finished trim turned into a belt

beaded and finished trim turned into a belt

This isn’t an especially exciting part of the costume, but pretty vital to give the outfit some shape – since the dress is quite shapeless. Since all of my other long belts are for my early-period Norse costumes, I needed to make something new (and blingy!) for this one.

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