Viking brooches – penannular

 

Illustration in a book explaining different Viking Age brooches

Illustration in a book explaining different Viking Age brooches

I’ve shown you photographs from some of the museum brooch exhibits from Iceland over the past few posts. Today I’m going to show off the last group; penannular brooches.

trifoil/tri-lobe brooches
 round brooches
U
rnes & Jelling style brooches

Penannular Brooches

In the photo above, a man has a Penannular brooch securing his cloak on one shoulder. For an in-depth look at what this illustration shows, please visit my previous post, on tortoise brooches.

The display in the Saga Museum, the male figure has a penannular brooch securing his cloak as well.

penannular brooch on the figure at the Saga Museum

penannular brooch on the figure at the Saga Museum

The display below isn’t dated, but the horns in the background are from the 15-17th centuries, however the display also includes rings, pendants, and penannular brooches. Continue reading

Viking brooches – Urnes, Jelling, and others

Authentic finds of scroll-like brooches at the Iceland National Museum

Authentic finds of scroll-like brooches at the Iceland National Museum

In my previous post I showed off trifoil/tri-lobe brooches, and round brooches. In today’s post I’ll show off some of the Urnes style brooches from the 11th century from the Iceland National Museum along with a few others.

Urnes style brooches

 

An assortment of brooches in the Iceland National Museum.

An assortment of brooches in the Iceland National Museum.

I shared this photo in my last post – and on the right side is the Urnes style brooches displayed at the top of the post.  These are from the 11th century, and the museum describes them as one made of silver while the other is gilt bronze. Continue reading

Viking brooches – round brooches

 

An assortment of brooches in the Iceland National Museum.

An assortment of brooches in the Iceland National Museum.

In my previous post I showed off trifoil/tri-lobe brooches, and in today’s post I’ll show off some of the round brooches from the Iceland National Museum.

Round Brooches

The first group of round brooches, shown at the top of this page and below are included in a display: “Most of the earliest jewelry is ornamented similarly to that from Viking Age Scandinavia. The most frequent finds are women’s brooches, which were used to fasten the over-tunics at the shoulders.”
The four round brooches below, (in the middle under the trifoil brooches) are just listed as “in the Nordic style” and the display didn’t include locations or dates for the finds. Continue reading

Viking brooches – trifoil

An assortment of brooches in the Iceland National Museum.

An assortment of brooches in the Iceland National Museum.

In a previous post, I showed off some of the tortoise (oval, turtle) brooches from the Iceland National Museum – along with a discussion about different artistic/decorative jewelry styles from the Vikings.  In the next four posts I’m going to look at brooches of different styles.

Tri-lobed/trifoil/trefoil brooches

Authentic tri-lobed brooches at the Iceland National Museum

Authentic tri-lobed brooches at the Iceland National Museum

Trifoil or Tri-lobed brooches are often shown either holding edges of a cloak, shawl, or coat together, or when used with a C-wrapped apron-dress, holding edges of the apron dress together. Continue reading

Viking weapon decorations

Beautiful ornamentation for Viking Age weapons.

Beautiful ornamentation for Viking Age weapons.

Just a super-quick post to share with you today. Early in the Iceland National Museum exhibition of the Settlement Age, they mentioned that much of the art that survived came either in jewelry, or in weapon decoration. Today’s post is just two photos of some of the latter, since I’ve already spent so much time on the former (oh.. and there’s more to come!)

Continue reading

Icelandic drinking horns

Drinking horns along with brooches and other items in the Iceland National Museum

Drinking horns along with brooches and other items in the Iceland National Museum

It doesn’t really directly apply to my interest in Viking Age costuming, but I thought I’d also share a display from the Iceland National Museum on some of the drinking horns.  These weren’t actually from the Settlement Age area of the museum, but rather in a display on the “New Ruling Class” in the Middle Ages in Iceland. The display stated that drinking horns “were common in the Nordic world in the Middle Ages, used for toasts on special occasions”, but that “only in Iceland were such horns decorated with carvings, the oldest one still in existence daring to the first half of the 15th century”.

From top left, clockwise:

  • “Drinking horn with carvings of King David, St. Olav and probably Solomon. Inscription: God so loved the world – 16th century”
  • “Drinking horn depicting Adam and Eve at [the] tree of [ ] Knowledge of Good and Evil. 17th century”
  • “Unusually well-preserved drinking horn with images of monsters, the head of a beast, a human face and interlaced decoration.”
  • “Drinking horn with images of St. Anne, Mary and infant Jesus, and Christ on the cross in the embrace of God the Father, 15th century.”
  • The dark coloured one in the back is noted as “Mariuhorn, drinking horn with the [inscription] Ave Maria”.

 

Carved horns  in the Iceland National Museum

Carved horns in the Iceland National Museum

Above – close up on the unusually well-preserved horn.

Continue reading

Viking full beaded necklace

Beaded necklace from a woman's grave

Beaded necklace from a woman’s grave

In my previous post I showed you a full necklace from the Iceland National Museum which was glass, amber, and rock crystal. (Pictured above). This was from a woman’s grave which included a great number of grave goods including jewelry and tools. Continue reading