Gathered necklines for Viking garb at the Saga Museum

The Volva at the Saga Museum

The Volva at the Saga Museum

Please note – lower in this post I’ve photographed a wax model which includes a bare breast. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with it, but if you disagree, you might want to skip this post.

Volva

At the Saga Museum in Reykjavik I saw a neckline that I found interesting – a gathered neckline creating a pleated underdress.  From my Viking research so far, it looks as though there has only been one find of a pleated underdress, however many of the Valkyrie figures suggest pleated underdresses. Continue reading

Viking Costume illustrations

Close up of the Viking Age costume

Close up of the Viking Age costume

In the entrance of the Settlement Museum there were a few interactive activities, mostly geared towards children. One was a list of runic characters suggesting people could write their name in the runic “alphabet”, another was small models of the buildings from the area during the Viking Age to lay out on the table as they appeared on site, one was a Viking game Hnefatafl and then two more were on the computer.

While the first computer game was putting the order of building a long house in the order of construction, the second one was a bit more up my alley – selecting clothing and assigning it either to a 19th Century or 9th Century woman in Iceland.

In this game the player selects various garment items and guesses which age they belong to

In this game the player selects various garment items and guesses which age they belong to

The way the game is intended to be played means that you have to put an item on the character. In my reading so far it looks like Viking women in the British Isles wore headscarves, but heathen Viking Age women didn’t on a regular basis (by grave findings at least). Likewise, the underdress is trimmed at the hem – again my research thus far suggests that no trim at hems have been found. The necklace on the Viking Age woman is also unique, and lastly I haven’t seen research for sideless apron dresses as displayed in the game.

Minjasafn Reykjavíkur – The Settlement Exhibition – Reykjavik 871 +/- 2
minjasafnreykjavikur.is/english/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-4206
Aðalstræti 16, Old West Side, Reykjavik, Iceland
+354 411 6370

Wire wrapping class – success!

Wire wrapping necklace, bracelet and earrings from The Bead Shop, Calgary

Wire wrapping necklace, bracelet and earrings from The Bead Shop, Calgary

On July 15 I posted about going to an interview to teach a class on wire-wrapping.  I did not have a lot of information going to the interview, and it actually turned out that the shop owner had an original teacher for this class who was unavailable – hence she needed a very last-minute substitute teacher.

She had a small display (above) of the completed project, and the following day… I was teaching the class! There were 10 participants, and each of them picked out their own beads, components, supplies and findings. Some of them had their own tools, but the shop also supplied some other tools straight off the wall for those without their own.
Continue reading

Viking age names in Iceland

I’ve gone out to a few SCA events, but as of yet I haven’t chosen a “persona”. However, part of this includes selecting a persona name which has some authenticity. With that in mind, when I saw that at the Iceland National Museum in Reykjavik that they had a list of names and nicknames from 800-1000 in Iceland.

Chieftain, Sibyl, and Priestess names

Display of common names and nicknames for Icelanders living during the VIking Age

Display of common names  for Icelanders living during the VIking Age

Nicknames and attributes

Display of common names and nicknames for Icelanders living during the VIking Age

Display of common nicknames & attributes for Icelanders living during the VIking Age

Celtic names

Display of common names and nicknames for Icelanders living during the VIking Age

Display of Celtic names for Icelanders living during the VIking Age

Common names for (Scandinavian) men and women 800-1000 in Iceland

Display of common names and nicknames for Icelanders living during the VIking Age

Display of common names and nicknames for Icelanders living during the VIking Age

Full screen from the museum

Display of common names and nicknames for Icelanders living during the VIking Age

The full screen

National Museum of Iceland
www.nationalmuseum.is
Suðurgata 41, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland
+354 530 2200

 

Wire wrapping class

Wire wrapping examples

Wire wrapping examples

Today I’m going for an interview with a local bead shop for the chance to do some teaching through their shop. The friend who made the introduction said that they were looking for wire-wrapping for the next class, so I pulled together some samples from my ‘stash’ to bring to the interview – and if I get the job, for samples for the class to see.

From top left clockwise:

  • Cage-style wire-wrapped glass cabochon (with a red faceted glass bead strung on red leather kumihimo braid).
  • Free-form style wire-wrapped lava with olivine crystals (topped off with a sea glass style clear/white bead).
  • Coil-wrapped wire and bead bracelet. This is a re-creation of a bracelet I did previously, so for this one I just used plastic faceted beads as an example, instead of the glass beads I originally used (for a bracelet I subsequently gave away as a gift).
  • Free-form style wire-wrapped beach-found coral from Hawaii (accented with teal-blue silver-lined seed beads).

For the class I also pulled together a few brochures on how to do some techniques like the free-form style, the cage-style, and the coil-wrapped bracelet style. After the class is over I’ll try to post the instructions here on my blog too! Let me know in the comments below what you’d like to see first!

Wish me luck!

 

Saga museum in Iceland -female costume

Mother and son figure at the Saga Museum

Mother and son figure at the Saga Museum

For those of you who follow the other blog that I write for, Happy Sushi Belly, might know that in July I went to Iceland. While there I visited a few different places that gave me some information for my ongoing Viking costume research.

One of these was the Saga Museum in Reykjavik.

Please note – one of the figures displayed below includes a wax interpretation of a female breast. I see nothing wrong with it, but if you find such offensive, you might want to skip this post.

Located near the Viking Maritime Museum (which I didn’t visit), the Saga Museum features 17 scenes from Icelandic Sagas, and the information about the museum claims that they have strived for a high level of authenticity. Along with the displays (wax figures depicting scenes) there are signs, and a descriptive audio guide on MP3 which gives a lot of information about the scene, the time, the location, and the activities.

I did note, however the slight inconsistencies between what I’d researched, and some of the female adult attire displayed.

874

The wax figures representing the earliest settlers of Iceland in the Saga Museum

The wax figures representing the earliest settlers of Iceland in the Saga Museum

For instance, there is a depiction dated to around 874, one of the first people living in Iceland and the woman (Hallveig Fróðadóttir) is wearing an Apron Dress in the priced and fitted style of the 10the century (I think, based on my research so far) without trim of any sort ( on her Apron dress, cloak, or underdress). They’ve also cut the Apron dress under arms in much more of a shaped, curved shape, rather than the simple cuts that I would have predicted.

I’ll be exploring this a bit more in the future.

Continue reading

Viking costume reproductions

Reproduction dress with center front two-part gores, two-part side seam gores, and rectangular  sewn-on sleeves, rounded neckline.

Reproduction dress with center front two-part gores, two-part side seam gores, and rectangular sewn-on sleeves, rounded neckline with slit front.

Since there haven’t been very many textile fragments found in Iceland of Viking Age clothing, I am including some of the re-creations from the “hands on” room at the Iceland National Museum in Reykjavik.  This was kind of a cool room, obviously geared largely towards children.  They included Viking Age clothing, Medieval Iceland clothing, and then examples of the Iceland historic national dress as well to dress up in and take photos.  They also had games, a saddle, and other things.

I took photos of a few items of clothing that appeared to be Viking Age reproductions – however none of it was tagged to indicate what kind of examples inspired the garments…

Purple under gown

The first is this purple dress as shown above. It has a center front two-piece gore (with a seam down the center) which is repeated on the back as well. It also has a two-piece gore on each side seam, adding extra flare to the hem. The neckline is rounded with a slit, and the neckline is faced with a narrow band of self-fabric.  The sleeves are rectangular, and sewn on with a straight seam.  The neckline is top-stitched with a hand-sewn running stitch.

Continue reading